Tag Archives: working from home

Walking Away From A Bullying Client Who Causes Your Team To Suffer

Walking Away From A Bullying Client Who Cause Our Team To Suffer

Click to read: Walking Away From A Bullying Client Who Causes Our Team To Suffer

Source: Campaign Asia

Snippet: We were working with our largest client at the time. And we were giving everything to service an account worth £1m. Sadly, we found out that our team members were being destroyed by the negative values that this client held. Also by the way he was treating our team. Unfortunately, some of our team members were already living with mental health challenges. And I had also had a mini-stroke and heart surgery since starting the company.

Consequently when we were deciding on what action to take, we chose to put our employees first. We walked away from the account.

Just because we showed where our company’s values were, we gave our employees a better work-life balance and a healthier mindset. This simple action also meant that clients will receive a much higher standard of service from the team.

Corporate Kindness

When people are supported, they enjoy coming to work. This ultimately leads to increased productivity. And that is why I co-founded “Corporate Kindness,” an initiative to encourage companies to lead with kindness.

A great example of “Corporate Kindness” was the open letter by Brian Chesky, chief executive of Airbnb. In the letter, he explained how the company arrived at its decision to downsize and who to let go. He also talked about how the company was supporting those it could no longer employ by helping them to find other jobs.

Corporate kindness can help employees know when to make the call and start walking away from a bullying client. Studies have shown that kindness improves productivity. It also lowers employee recruitment and training costs.

Kelly Allison is chief executive of digital and brand experience agency KVA. Also co-founder of #CorporateKindness

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Home Office Burnout Is Real: Here’s The Way Out

Home office burnout is real: here’s what you can do about it

The global work-from-home experiment has rewritten the productivity playbook. Working from home or living at work? Thriving, or simply trying to survive? The home office burnout is real!

By now, the thrill of trading in the office commute for a few short steps to the desk has long worn off. Now faced with fewer (if any) face to face meetings with colleagues, there is the overnight evaporation of casual corridor conversations. And what were once interactive workshops are now reduced to sharing screens.

Whereas, whilst the workplace dynamic has shifted, the relentless pursuit of delivering impactful results has not. Also, there is the increasingly blurring boundary between home and work life. This have paved the way for the rise of the ‘always-on’ home office. With the increasing risk of burnout.

According to a recent study by Forbes, more than two-thirds of workers surveyed in the US have reported an increase in burnout symptoms. Clearly, changes are needed. To promote a better work-life balance, here are three simple ways to improve productivity from the home office.

Focus On The Output, Not The Hours

Rather than measuring success base on the number of hours spent at the desk, set a list of impactful deliverables to complete. Prioritize the most impactful tasks first and worry less about trying to get through your entire to-do list.

Lights, Camera … Action!

From all the calls you attended last week, who left a memorable impression on you? Chances are, it was those who had their camera switched on. And whilst it may seem easy and often tempting to opt for audio-only, switching the camera on can have a profound impact on your presence in the virtual meeting room.

Most importantly, remember to look directly into your camera’s lens. Whilst it might take a bit of getting used to at first, looking into the lens equates to looking directly at your audience – just like being in the office.

Take Breaks, And Take Them Often

When it comes to working effectively from home, taking regular breaks is an absolute necessity. Set aside a 30-minute meeting with yourself at least once a day.

This will give you time to clear your mind, refocus and reflect on your progress. It will leave you feeling significantly re-energised and enable you strategize on what you want to get out of the rest of the day. And if you find there are too many meetings in your calendar preventing you from taking breaks, get ahead of the game and block the time in your diary.

Your 30-minute break might be a short-sweat session, a meditation program, a call to your best friend, or even a walk around the neighbourhood.

Being At Your Best

Home office burnout is real, but by implementing and embracing new norms and ways of working you can make a difference. You can optimize for better physical, mental, and emotional well-being. This will in turn translate into improved productivity.


You can find the original version of this article as written by Robert Simons at www.thedrum.com. Robert Simons is head of partner and developer marketing, International Markets . He is also a member of The Marketing Society Asia.

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Bring-Your-Child-To-Work-Day Is Every Day In A Pandemic

Work-Life Daily_ Bring-Your-Child-To-Work-Day

Click to read: Bring-Your-Child-To-Work-Day Is Every Day In A Pandemic

Source: Daily Herald

Snippet: Years before “Take Our Daughters and Sons to Work Day” became a thing, my dad occasionally brought me to his office as the need arose. There was something a bit thrilling about gaining entry into this adult world of cubicles, dry-erase boards and name badges.

It was a novelty to see Dad in this grown-up space. But today, when so many parents are working from home alongside kids who are schooling from home, every day is bring-your-child-to-work-day. And “novelty” no longer describes it.

“Work-from-home and school-from-home means that people are bringing their kids to work but leaving them to play in the parking lot.”

Children aren’t getting an especially exciting view of what their moms and dads do for work. Parents who are capable of working remotely tend to be knowledge workers. And their work mostly happens inside the brain. There’s not a lot to see. Nor are kids getting to see the fun parts of work, like business travel or professional conferences.

Leaving Them To Play In The Parking Lot

Many parents trying to work from home may be interacting less with their children, not more. “In counties where people are staying home the most, we’re seeing more neglect,” says Kerri Raissian, an associate professor of public policy at the University of Connecticut, citing preliminary data from Indiana and Georgia. That’s a first.

Before the pandemic, increased time at home wasn’t associated with child maltreatment. But now, calls to poison control are up. So also are acute pediatric injuries, such as bicycle accidents. This is presumably because kids are getting into trouble while their parents are trying to work. Basically, Raissian says, work-from-home and school-from-home means that “people are bringing their kids to work but leaving them to play in the parking lot.”

“It’s important to remember as parents that we’re modeling how you get the things you want, how you self-advocate and set boundaries,” says Marisa Porges. When a parent explains to her boss that she can’t have a call at 7 p.m. because it’s dinner time, not only does she show her children that they come first, but she also shows them it’s OK for work to come second.

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Working Moms Battles And The Mental Health Toll

Work-Life Daily_ Working Moms Battles And The Mental Health Toll

Click to read: Working Moms Battles And The Mental Health Toll

Source: Washington Post

Snippet: When they met as students in Chicago, 20 years ago, Vondetta Taylor and Jennifer Anderson were all aspiration. Taylor was training to be a chef. Anderson was working toward a career in broadcasting. They also dreamed of starting families.

As the years passed, the two women traced over those youthful visions with the brushstrokes of real life. Anderson, now 41, got married, moved to Indiana, had a son and started a career in information-technology. Taylor, 38, gave birth to a son she was raising alone while selling insurance full-time.

“Moms are the ones who’ve been left holding the threads. And eventually they just can’t hold on any longer.”

Jessica McCrory Calarco

Taylor was supposed to make 100 sales calls a day while managing her kindergartner’s online education.

Anderson’s husband couldn’t do his custodial work from home, so it was on her to stay home with their 10-year-old son. His school announced it was going to be remote in the fall; Anderson’s employer said she had to come back to the office in late August.

“Working moms: a teacher, a disciplinarian, a mental health counselor, an extracurricular-activities director and working professional. And there was still only one of her.”

Just like that, these two friends became part of a legion of other women leaving the U.S. labor force. In September alone more than 860,000 women dropped out of the workforce, compared to just over 200,000 men. An analysis by the National Women’s Law Center found that women left the labor force at four times the rate of men in September, just as schools came back in session.

Selfless Love Battles Mental Health And Professional Loss

The mental health toll is visceral and immediate. But the pandemic could also have serious, long-term costs to the financial health of American women. Each day out of a job is a day not spent working toward financial independence or saving for the future. Women without jobs can’t earn raises. They can’t move into leadership roles or advocate for one another. The longer they spend out of the workforce, the harder it will be to get back in.

“The big ticket to inequality in the home is that the men can usually assume that because the mom loves the kids, she will not let the ball drop.”

Julie A. Nelson

However, despite all the battles that working moms face daily, none has been able to overcome their selfless love. That is a woman’s innate arsenal and strength, and she is always willing and able to deploy it effectively.

Sadly, a working woman who takes pride in her professional life, can work so “super hard” to get her dream job. But when life happens, like when pandemic struck, both the math and society’s expectations always gets stacked against her.

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Kid Consolation When Parents Lose Their Jobs

Work-Life Daily_ Kids Consolation When Parents Lose Their Jobs

Click to read: Kid Consolation When Parents Lose Their Jobs – When Parents Lose Their Jobs, Their Children Also Suffer. But Sometimes There’s A Consolation

Source: New York Times

Snippet: In six months without steady work, Gregory Pike, a single father in Las Vegas, has fallen behind on his rent and utilities. He borrowed money he cannot repay. Turned to food stamps and charity, and fretted that his setbacks may cloud his daughter’s future.

“We have benefited having more time together but not having money is not good. I’m being evicted.”

Michigan single mother

But despite the problems he has experienced since March, when the coronavirus eliminated his job, Mr. Pike has found an unexpected source of comfort, his kid consolation. That is time with his 6-year-old daughter, Makayla, whom he has raised alone for three years.

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Is There Any Consolation In Being Temporarily Unemployed?

“You know, I’ve gotten to know my kids a lot more,” said Aileen Kelly, a single mother of five who lost her job as a casino housekeeper at the pandemic’s start. “When you’re working, you don’t get the real feeling of raising your kids. You’re providing for them but you’re not teaching them.” But such rewards do not reduce the risks that unemployment brings.

“No one’s saying that families would choose to be unemployed. But I think we forget how short of time, low-income families have. They are short of time, short of money and often short of sleep,” said Jane Waldfogel, a professor at the Columbia School of Social Work. “If people are telling us they don’t have enough time with their children, that’s worth listening to. It’s an odd silver lining, but it’s there.”

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Working Moms And Dads Pick Your Slack

Work-Life Daily_ Working Moms And Dads Pick Up Your Slack

Click to read: Working Moms And Dads Pick Up Your Slack: Worker Resents Having To Pick Up Slack For Working Moms And Dads

Source: Washington Post

Snippet: Our federal workplace, under the Cares Act, permits parents to work 75 percent of their hours (30 hours/week, any days or times) for the same pay. I’m glad not to lose my teammates and work friends. And glad they can better balance their personal lives and work.

“Parents let’s be frank, moms are, like you. They are buried in additional unpaid work they can’t turn down.”

But this has translated to a heavy burden on those of us who are child-free. I’m overloaded, and the assignments just keep coming, with no legitimate-enough excuse to make my “no, thank you” stick. The constant narrative from leadership is what heroes parents are — and they are. But those of us without kids are doing so much heavy lifting, and we have families, too.

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Besides, I know that even though parenthood is a choice, having kids at home during a pandemic wasn’t. As an employed, teleworking, snugly housed and safe person, I know I’m privileged. That said, my workplace feels very unequal right now. Surely, it sounds ugly out loud. As a married woman without children, I’m losing my empathy and patience after months of being treated as though my time is therefore infinite. Therefore, working Moms and Dads need to pick up their slack!

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Work Life Balance – Dispelling The Myth!

Work-Life Daily_Work Life Balance - Dispelling The Myth

Click to read: Work Life Balance – Dispelling The Myth!

Source: Aero Tech News

Snippet: I recently stepped into a new role as an executive team member at a high-tempo organization. Later, I found myself having great conversations with friends and mentors about finding a healthy work-life balance.

As we talked though our day-to-day challenges in the face of COVID-19 and shared mutual experiences, one thing became apparent — no one’s balance is exactly the same. We all often discuss this topic as if there is some perfect, universal balance that exists daily. One that we can all can obtain. But no, that is not the way it is. In reality it is unique to each of us and to different times in our lives.

You may like this; Worklife Balance or Integration – What’s the difference?

Balance can’t always be measured a day or even week at a time. Balance, like resiliency, is measured over the long haul. And part of finding this long-term healthy mindset is acknowledging the fact that the desired work-life balance may be slightly off day to day.

No family structure is the same, so by default, priorities are different. To address this balance, here are some steps to take; find activities that recharge you, communicate your boundaries, and don’t forget about you. These are three out of nine other suggestions in the Aero tech News report.

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The 9-5 Is Dead And Workplaces Will Not ‘Return To Normal’

Worklife Daily_The 9-5 is Dead And Workplaces Will Not 'Return To Normal'

Click to read: The 9-5 is Dead And Workplaces Will Not ‘Return To Normal’

Source: Daily Mail

Snippet: COVID-19 pandemic brought several fast paced changes to our daily lives, least of which is not the forced working from home. Starting initially with some few weeks of lack of clarity, months have rolled in with many working from home since then.

Google, Salesforce and Facebook are among businesses that have said that their employees can work from home until at least next summer. Microsoft and Twitter have said some staff can do so forever. On the surface, it seems that the Coronavirus have killed the traditional 9 to 5 office routine.

Recommended: In New Normal How Will We Go Back To Work? – Poll

However, a new report has claimed that the office will remain a key part of British working life. And it describes as speculation and ‘misplaced’, the idea that the office is dead.

The publication warns that workplaces ‘will not return to normal’ after the pandemic is brought under control – with employees having adapted to the ‘new normal’ of working from home during the Covid-19 lockdown.

The 9-5 Is Dead And Workplaces Are Dead – That Is Speculation And ‘Misplaced’

The report collated information and surveys from dozens of publicly available studies. It quoted one source which says that 41 per cent of remote employees reported higher levels of stress. This is high compared with 25 per cent of their counterparts who are in the office.

Another study by NordVPN that the report highlights, claimed that UK employees have been adding around two hours to each workday while working from home. This means that they have been adding an extra working week per month.

Yet another study by the International Workplace Group (IWG) claimed that 85 per cent of businesses had confirmed that productivity increased as a result of having greater flexibility. The group said that 63 per cent of those surveyed report a minimum 21 per cent improvement in productivity.

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Germany to give people the legal right to work from home

Germany To Give People The Legal Right To Work From Home

Click to read: Germany To Give People The Legal Right To Work From Home

Image: Unsplash/Mikey Harris

Source: World Economic Forum

Snippet: Germany has said that it wants to give its citizens the legal right to work from home. Workers in many parts of the globe are now much more familiar with the ins and outs of the remote office than they were at the start of this year. In Germany, about 40% of people wanted to work from home at least some of the time even before the pandemic struck.

And the country has been looking at initiatives to get companies to allow employees to work from home since early 2019. Now, as the pandemic has given a glimpse of what’s possible, it’s looking to make it official. The draft law will be published in a few weeks’ time, the country’s labour minister told the Financial Times.

Recommended: Ireland Remote Working Hubs To Be Funded By The State

German Labor and Social Affairs Minister Hubertus Heil said he plans to present a bill this autumn in a bid to see this enshrined in law. “Anyone who wants to, and whose workplace allows it, should be able to work at home — even when the coronavirus pandemic is over,” he said.

And, crucially, there’s a plan to reinforce workers’ rights and set clearer boundaries between personal and work lives.

The work from home till forever movement – an unending global trend

Google, Salesforce and Facebook are among businesses that have said employees can work from home until at least next summer. Microsoft and Twitter have said some staff can do so forever. And in the US, 69% of financial services companies surveyed by PwC said they expect almost two-thirds of their workforce to be working from home once a week in the future. Pre-pandemic, this figure was 29%.

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Ireland Remote Working Hubs To Be Funded By The State

Work-Life Daily_Ireland Remote Working Hubs To Be Funded By The State

Click to read: Ireland Remote Working Hubs To Be Funded By The State

Source: The Irish Times

Snippet: The Irish Government plans to fund remote hubs in rural towns and villages over the next two years. This is part of the development of a State strategy on remote working.

Mr Varadkar, who is Minister for Enterprise, Trade and Employment, said the move to remote working in recent months, because of the pandemic, “probably would have taken 10 years as a planned strategy”.

Despite the fast pace of change, there is a growing concern about remote working, which is being ‘always at work.’

Sinn Féin spokeswoman, Louise O’Reilly said that “if you work from home you’re sort of always at work and sort of always at home. There needs to be a clear definition of remote working as a protected form of work.”

There is also the concern that while promoting Ireland remote working hubs, jobs do not to other countries.

Tánaiste Leo Varadkar warned that “we have to look at the risks to the country as well of people who currently live in Ireland, perhaps remote working from the Canaries, or Ibiza or Poland or India. That’s a real risk to us in terms of losing jobs”.

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