Tag Archives: mentor

The Power Of Personal Profile – Warwick Business School

THE POWER OF PERSONAL PROFILE - WARWICK BUSINESS SCHOOL_wbs

There is a lot of power and developmental transformation that you can mine from your personal profile if you can just give it the right attention and focus.

Your personal profile is beyond what is written. It is beyond the personal descriptive statement that you put on your social media ‘DP’ or on your resume. It is what characterize who you are, your accomplishments, strength and skills. This is about your future riding on your past.

Personal profile can be one of the most powerful elements in your business armoury, but you have to know what tools and techniques will help you build it, protect it and drive your success. Culturally, many of us are brought up not to “toot our own horns” or “shout about our successes.” But in today’s highly competitive world, if you don’t stand out, you’re likely to watch those with a higher profile pass you by on their way to the top. 

Throughout this interactive and practical session, Vanessa will share stories from her career; starting in Banking in the City at 16 and her rise to the C-suite. 

Vanessa will provide the top tips she’s picked up in corporates, as an entrepreneur and as a network leader, and encourage you to become comfortable with raising your profile.

The Power of Profile – Toot Your Horns

THE POWER OF PERSONAL PROFILE - WARWICK BUSINESS SCHOOL
  • How to stop feeling like an imposter
  • How to focus on your personal brand and exhibit leadership behaviours
  • The importance of networking and building relationships for the future
  • Speed networking – Getting to know your fellow guests
  • Optimising your digital footprint 
  • Coach, Mentor, Sponsor – who can help you drive your career
  • The importance of giving back. 

Vanessa will provide guidance on a wide array of profile -raising opportunities that are easy to implement straight away.

She’ll help you take the next steps towards raising your profile and attracting opportunities to progress in your career and help others too.

Interested?

The Power of Personal Profile: Event Date: 25 November 2020

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Right Mentoring For Success In Career And Leadership

RIGHT MENTORING FOR SUCCESS IN CAREER AND LEADERSHIP

A right mentoring relationship can be a powerful tool for professional growth. It can lead to a new job, a promotion, or even a better work-life balance. But what does it take to be a great mentor or mentee? How do mentees find mentors to meet their career goals?

To find answers, hook up to an upcoming event with a right mentoring package – the Pennsylvania State University School of Public Policy offer. They are getting set to developing the next generation of problem solvers and leaders.

“A mentor is someone who sees more talent and ability within you, than you see in yourself, and helps bring it out of you.”

Bob Proctor

Right Mentoring As A Strategy For Career And Leadership Success

PENN States’s School of Public Policy offers a monthly professional development series called, “Strategies for Career and Leadership Success.” The next event will address the power of mentoring relationships. It will be starting at 11:30 a.m. on Wednesday, Nov. 11. See below for more details about how to register for the event.

You may also like; Yale Young Global Scholars (YYGS) 2021 Program

Since June 2020, the PENN States’s professional development series has been helping students, recent graduates, and current professionals develop their career and leadership skills. The program provides opportunities to learn skills related to interviewing, professional presence, and how to maximize the internship experience. Participants also learn how to build organizational relationships, and more.

The November 11 mentoring session will be led by 2013 Penn State alumnus Jeremy O’Mard. He earned his bachelor’s degree in management information systems with a minor in operations and supply chain management. Currently, he is a managing consultant in the Managed Services and Cloud Solutions Practice of IBM Global Business Services. And he has worked with commercial, state government, and federal government agencies, serving in both technical and operational roles.

O’Mard’s Career Kick-start And FastStart Mentorship Program

During the event, O’Mard will discuss the mentorship process from mentor and mentee perspectives. Using his experience, he will be providing advice for identifying a mentor, and strategies for making the relationship work.

O’Mard said his involvement with mentoring began when he joined the FastStart Mentorship Program during his senior year at Penn State.

FastStart typically matches first-year students from underrepresented backgrounds with a faculty/staff mentor and a Penn State alumni mentor. This is a program that is designed to help students flourish in their new environment. It works through a simple process of answering questions, directing students to resources, offering support and wisdom, and providing informal networks for career development.

“If you cannot see where you are going, ask someone who has been there before.”

J Loren Norris

There is great benefit in horizontal peer to peer mentoring. However, the type of mentoring most people look out for, is a mentor they admire. Most times, someone who is a senior to them. Take time to explore this Harvard Business Review article if you want to build a mentoring relationship with a leader that you admire.

Passing On Lessons Learnt

“I remember the many lessons that I learned during the first half of my college career. And I thought it would be great if I could help incoming students navigate the college landscape. Especially students from underrepresented communities or disadvantaged backgrounds,” said O’Mard. “My first stint as a mentor was an eye-opening and enriching experience. It was great to know that my mentee was able to apply some of the tips that I provided.”

After graduating, O’Mard continued to serve as a mentor in the FastStart program. He says he enjoyed both teaching and learning from his mentees and consequently became involved as both a mentor and a mentee at IBM.

“Ironically, one of my mentees [at IBM] is a student at Penn State,” he said. “I can honestly say that I have learned a lot, personally and professionally, serving as both a mentor and a mentee, and I would encourage others to get involved with mentoring.”

Take Action To Advance Your Personal Development

The upcoming conversation will be held via Zoom and consist of a brief interview followed by questions from the audience. Participants will have the option to ask questions during the live discussion or by email in advance of the presentation to publicpolicy@psu.edu.

For more information about the series and to RSVP for the Nov. 11 session, visit publicpolicy.psu.edu/careerstrategies. A Zoom link will be sent to all registrants in advance of the event.

Learn more about mentoring, personal development and various effective ways of learning through imentoring mentoring group. You can also get free Linda Phillips-Jones mentoring books collections.

Welcome to Worklife Feed articles and site-files indexing and adaptation series.

Build A Mentoring Relationship With A Leader You Admire

BUILD A MENTORING RELATIONSHIP WITH A LEADER YOU ADMIRE

image: trumzz/Getty Images/Build A Mentoring Relationship With A Leader You Admire

Years ago when I taught a graduate leadership course in Seattle, one of my students asked me to be his mentor. This was about a week after the class had ended. It was clear that the question was difficult for him. Throughout the course, he appeared disinterested in my teaching, aloof, and often scoffed at the materials I presented. I’d assumed that he didn’t like the course or me.

But what caught me off guard that day was his sincerity. He explained that he’d had some bad experiences with mentors in the past. He came to realize that the people he had reached out to and admired weren’t genuinely interested in helping him grow. And they usually wanted something in return: free labor, an ego boost, the chance to feel important.

Trusting someone he wanted to learn from was still difficult. But he’d found the courage to ask me anyway. His vulnerability was disarming. I’d never been formally asked to “mentor” anyone and I felt like a fraud. I feared that if he knew my many flaws and insecurities, I’d end up being yet another disappointment.

Reluctantly, I agreed and decided I could simply hide those parts of myself.

Trust, Vulnerability And Growth In Mentoring Relationships

It wasn’t until months later, when we had built a foundation of trust, that I felt comfortable enough to follow his example. Sick of carrying around my angst, I confessed my fears about being the “perfect” mentor. As it turned out, the last thing he wanted was my perfection. He wanted me to be human, to see how I dealt with my shortfalls, and grew to trust me more because I acknowledged them.

I tell this story because I understand how complicated relationships between different generations can be in academic and professional settings. We spend a great deal of time comparing what we each have to offer to one another, and to the world.

In academia, young students want professors to help them make sense of the world. While their professors are worried about keeping up with their publishing demands.

At work, many emerging leaders feel those senior to them stand in their way. While those in senior roles privately question their relevance in the face of younger, tech-savvy newcomers. Such is the dilemma that both sides faces in an effort to build a mentoring relationship.

It Is Beyond The Legacy Or Wisdom Of Older Leaders, We Need Each Other

The irony is that the legacy of older leaders is only secured through helping the young ones reach their potential. And the opportunity to fulfill your potential as a young leader can be realized much more fully if you make an effort to inherit the wisdom of your predecessors. We need each other to feel like we both matter.

If a senior leader you want to connect with hasn’t figured that out yet, there are ways to help them, as my mentee helped me. Of course, all generations have more work to do in this area. These connections can only be made if both sides build bridges and make an effort to understand our mutual wants and differences.

But right now, I want to empower you, the young leader, with a few tools that I’ve seen help lay the foundation.

Test Your Assumptions And Labels. 

Chances are, if you’ve struggled to connect with a particular older leader, you’ve formed biases about them. You may have interpreted some of their behavior as off-putting, unapproachable, or disinterested in you. While your concerns may very well be valid, it’s also important to check yourself before completely writing them off.

I initially interpreted my student’s aloofness as disinterest. When in fact, it was the opposite. You may be surprised by what you find when you dig a little deeper.

Before shutting the door on a relationship with an older employee, put yourself in their shoes. Could you be misinterpreting where they are coming from? Are you projecting some of your own anxiety or misgivings onto them?

If you have any connection with someone who knows them better, check in with them to find out more to test your beliefs. Make sure that your criteria for judging their behavior isn’t based on how similar or different they are from you. The things that are different about them, may end up being the most valuable.

Use Vulnerability, Not Just Confidence, To Build Credibility

Many emerging leaders feel the best way to win the approval of older leaders is to appear confident, smart, and assertive. But that can backfire. It can come across as entitled or overly self-assured.

After asking me to be his mentor, my graduate student went on to confess that his behavior during our class was his way of trying to prove that he didn’t need help. He told me, “It’s funny, I was looking to be developed and led by trying to convince both of us that I needed neither.” His humility deeply impressed me.

What will show more seasoned leaders your maturity and credibility is being vulnerable. Being able to openly talk about what you don’t know. Asking for help in places you feel unsure, and acknowledging areas you need to improve. While that may feel risky, older leaders know that there’s only so much legitimately earned confidence, someone who is early in their career will have. Faking more than you have will only make others less likely to trust you.

Demonstrating that you know your limitations by being confident enough to ask for help indicates you are trustworthy and open to learning. If you are struggling with a project, for instance, you might say, “I’d love to get your input on this. I’m feeling really good about these parts, but I haven’t had enough experience in this area and I know that it’s your expertise.”

Avoid Complete Deference

On the other hand, extreme deference can create distance. In some cases, it can make you come across as a suck up. In others, it establishes a formality that makes senior leaders feel as though they always have to “be on” when they are around you.

Believe it or not, deference triggers a sense of imposter syndrome, a fear many older leaders have (that they aren’t worthy of the role they are in). This was my struggle in my relationship with my graduate student.

Recommended: Mentoring During A Crisis – Place Of Self And Mentee

You want to be someone that older leaders can feel safe with. Someone who they can be themselves around. When leaders across generations can learn to be vulnerable with one another, it can be transformational.

Find Common Ground

What many emerging leaders long for is to feel respected by older leaders.

Creating “peership” with older leaders — approaching them as equals without being cocky and showing respect for their seniority without being overly deferent — is one of the hardest parts of these relationships.

To establish mutuality, learn about their lives outside of work. If they have pictures of their family in their office, ask about them. Or, if you’re on a video call and one of their kids walks in the room, use that chance to learn more about their life. To build a mentoring relationship that will last long, also find out what interests they have outside of work.

When my student and I were first getting to know each other, I was still a newcomer to Seattle. My family and I were steeped in boxes from our move to the new city and he offered to help. As we unpacked boxes of books in my office, he asked about my clients and the work I did. It became a ritual for us to sit on the floor in front of the bookcase and tell stories of leaders facing real-life challenges.

Shared humanity is a great way to establish common ground, setting the foundation for a strong relationship. It also helps neutralize any hierarchical differences without ignoring them. You can show respect for your differences in experience by asking about their career choices and how they’ve approached their development.

Ask For What You Need

As simple as it sounds, seasoned leaders love when younger leaders cut to the chase and ask for what they want. If you want more time with someone, ask for it within reason. You probably can’t get an hour a week, but you might get an hour a month. With such baby steps, you will build a mentoring relationship that is fulfilling.

If you want more opportunities to have your ideas heard, ask for it. You can say, “I know our meetings are very full, but sharing my ideas is an area I need to grow in. Sometimes we move so fast that I don’t feel comfortable jumping into the fray. I wonder if we could set aside 15 minutes in an upcoming meeting for me to share an idea and engage the team?”

What Rejection Actually Mean

If you fear your request will be denied, you’re not alone. Many emerging leaders are afraid of the feeling of rejection that comes with that denial. Instead of personalizing silence, or a “no” answer, ask the other person to help you understand.

Whatever their response, they likely have your best interest in mind. You may have to ask several times to make something happen. This is why you should always ask with a level of respect, and explain why your request makes sense. Any hint of insistence, entitlement, or sulking if your request isn’t granted, is more likely to be met with resistance.

Remember that your desire to connect with more experienced colleagues is worthy and admirable. You are beginning to walk your way to build a mentoring relationship that is mutually beneficial. You are striving to learn from them, to offer something in return, and to broaden your network beyond your peers. Learning how to make those desires known to senior leaders takes practice, but it’s a skill you will use all your life.

It may feel risky, and at times, it will feel uncomfortable. But that discomfort is the same thing that will make your relationship go from enjoyable to transformational.

Start Now, Start Small. Keep It Friendly, Informal And Enjoyable

It takes some work to build a mentoring relationship. But you can start small. Who is a more experienced professional or leader that you admire? Someone you’d want to emulate? Whose career has made you think differently about your own?

Reach out to them. Let them know how they, and their work have influenced you. And then, ask for a 20-minute virtual coffee. Prepare one or two questions to ask them. Keep it friendly and informal. Let them feel enjoyed, and help them to enjoy you. Some of the greatest relationships of our lives start with a simple question over a cup of coffee.

Click to read the original script @ Harvard Business Review – Build a Relationship With a Senior Leader You Admire by Ron Carucci


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Mentoring During A Crisis – Place Of Self And Mentee

Mentoring During A Crisis - Place Of Self And Mentee

image: Westend61/Getty Images/Mentoring During A Crisis-Place Of Self And Mentee

Shortly after September 11, 2001, I (David) stood in the cafeteria line at work, anxieties still swirling in my mind. I happened to see one of my mentors, a senior member of our department. After we exchanged hellos, our conversation quickly turned to current events.

I remember he said two simple – yet powerful – words: “It’s scary.”

Almost instantly, my fears began to settle, replaced by a sense of connection. Knowing I wasn’t alone made a difference.

Even The Strong Need A Strong Hand Of Support

We have combined ~50 years of experience mentoring healthcare professionals before the Covid crisis. And now during it, we’ve learned just how important mentors can be—especially for those on the front lines.

For months, doctors, nurses, grocery store workers, postal carriers, and many others have been navigating physical danger, complexity, and uncertainty, with no end in sight. Now more than ever, they need emotional support.

But they can’t always turn to their managers. They also may be consumed with solving problems and likely overwhelmed with keeping their organizations running.

Workers may also fear their managers. They are the ones who hold the key to their future advancement. There is always the concern that managers may view  a request for help as a weakness. That is where you as a mentor can play a critical role. You can provide them with a stabilizing force. This is the time to be that someone who can help talk them down when they’re triggered, scared, burned out, or confused—all off the record.

Fortify Yourself First

However, if you consider yourself a mentor to someone on the front lines, the first step is to take care of yourself. You can’t offer emotional support if you don’t have your own emotional fortifications in place. Then you can turn to helping your mentee’s by offering them emotional support and concrete tactics.

First, you need to take stock of your capacity. Do you have the necessary time, focus, and energy for your mentee? If you don’t have time but still want to help, one solution is to help your mentee’s develop a  “team of mentors.”

If you do determine that you have the bandwidth to play a mentorship role, ask yourself: what can I do to fortify myself? Ultimately, you cannot provide care to others with an empty tank.

The Basics Are Not Luxuries But Essentials

Adequate sleep, nutrition, exercise, and activities that provide rejuvenation and meaning—such as meditation, prayer, nature walks, listening or playing music—are not luxuries; they are essential.  

Micro-practices such as keeping a gratitude journal, deep breathing, and moments of mindfulness such as when using hand sanitizer can build moments of wellness into your day. And they take only seconds to minutes to implement.

And just as your mentee benefits from having you and other mentors to support them, you need your own support network as well. Highly effective leaders lean on support teams of colleagues near or far, and good mentors do the same. Do this by scheduling regular check-in calls with friends, family, mentors, coaches, spiritual advisors, or mental health professionals.

Encourage Reverse Mentoring

In the same vein, keep in mind that your relationship with your mentee isn’t one-way. Being open to learning from your mentees can be a source of positive energy for both of you. Reverse mentoring can pay big dividends, both emotionally and practically.

Voicing your appreciation for these moments of exchange can also build your relationship and provide its own form of emotional support to your mentee.

Attend To Your Mentee’s Emotional Well-Being

In your work with your mentees, it may be tempting to focus on teaching them new skills. You may also feel the need to give them advice about how to solve specific technical problems. But during a crisis and for front-line workers, you’re one of the few places and persons they can turn to for emotional support. So it’s critical that you make their well-being a focus for any mentoring discussion.

Encourage your mentees to share what they’re feeling. Reassure them, offer wellness strategies, and affirm their strengths.

How Are You Really Doing?

Begin with listening. Ask your mentees, “How are you really doing?”—more than once. Expect to hear about grief, anxiety, and fear. Encourage them to talk about these feelings.

Naming emotions helps us feel them, and allows them to flow through us, bringing a helpful shift in brain activity and perspective. Expect too that your mentoring meetings may involve more emotion than usual, including tears.

Practise Highly Supportive Reflective Listening

If you’re worried about what exact words to use with your mentees, know that reflective listening is in itself highly supportive. This just involves taking the essence of what the mentee said and offering it back as a connecting confirmation that they have been heard and understood.

For example, if your mentee is describing how stressful work is, you could say, “I hear it’s really stressful—and it’s hard to know what to do with the unexpected.”  

If you want to dig deeper, you can ask, “What is your biggest challenge right now?  What is helping? What’s going well—or still OK—in your world?”

In times of stress, clarifying what is most important to your mentees can be the biggest gift of all. In so doing you help them appreciate and focus on the things that bring meaning and purpose to their life.

Lower Expectations, Appreciate Strength

Offer reassurance and opportunities for connection. Discuss lowering expectations in these uncertain times. Explain that they shouldn’t feel they have to push themselves beyond their limits.

At the same time, express your appreciation for their strengths.

Simply naming them can be surprisingly helpful: “One of the things I most appreciate is your curiosity and drive for learning.” Or: “Coronavirus is one for the history books. You’re helping to pull us through. Thank you.”

Encourage Increase In Number And Spread of Mentee’s Support Team

Finally, share tactics for supporting their emotional well-being. Encourage your mentees to have their own support team and to limit their media exposure.

Offer a detail or two about your support team, and how you use it; ask about their own loved ones. Even just talking about mental health resources helps to normalize them. Each of us has used a coach, psychologist, therapist, or spiritual counselor. And at various times, has shared this fact with our mentees, as appropriate.

For both mentors and mentees, this may also be an especially meaningful time to renew dormant connections. Even if it’s been years since you’ve been in touch. A “check-in” call or e-mail can help.

And while virtual mentoring may not be as satisfying as the in-person kind, there is evidence supporting its efficacy.  In ways large and small, one person can make a lasting difference.

Even a few words, mentioned in passing, can last a lifetime.

Click to read the original script @ Harvard Business Review – Mentoring During A Crisis by David P. Fessell, Vineet Chopra and Sanjay Saint


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I am a CEO with stage 4 cancer. Let me tell you about life

I’m a CEO with stage 4 cancer. Here’s what I can tell you about life

image: Getty/CEO’s major lesson after cancer diagnosis/I Am A CEO With A Stage 4 Cancer. Let Me Tell You About Life.

As the CEO of US real estate company, Keyrenter Franchise, Aaron Marshall spent around 60 to 90 hours per week at work. That all changed when he was diagnosed with stage two and stage four cancer in his appendix, colon and liver.

“After a diagnosis of cancer, it changes your entire thinking,” Marshall told Yahoo Finance. “It helps put things in perspective, and things that once were a priority were no longer so.”

I Am A CEO With Stage 4 Cancer

In the beginning, Marshall considered stepping down from his role as CEO, but his wife urged him to stay on.

“My wife gave me the advice I needed – she said, ‘you need something to get yourself out of bed in the morning’,” he said.

As a CEO, it can be hard to take your foot off the pedal and allow your staff to do the hard yards. But this is exactly what Marshall had to do if he was going to continue.

“I knew I needed to focus on healing my body, but I also needed something to get me out of bed. I re-prioritised my days and delegated many tasks to my capable team,” he said.

And this is one of those that always seems impossible. “I empowered them to succeed in their roles. And now, I meet with them one-on-one each week to ensure they are confident in what they are doing. The company has a vision and each team member is part of that.”

But while Marshall finally learned the importance of having a great work-life balance, he said his biggest lesson through it all was this: “Life is precious.”

“Even more so now, I encourage people to find their passion and follow it,” he said.

Live Like There’s No Expiration Date

Despite his cancer diagnosis, Marshall said he doesn’t believe in expiration dates. He believes everyone should live the same way, cancer or not.

“Growing up, my parents always said they would vacation and do more things once they retired and had more time,” Marshall said.

“Shortly after retirement, my mum was diagnosed with a disease that put her in a wheelchair. They have made travel work in their retirement, but it’s not the way they envisioned.”

So, Marshall made a decision early on not to wait.

“Life is about the journey, and we need to enjoy it. We need not wait until some future day that may never come,” he said. “Since my diagnosis, this drive has only increased. I want to make memories with my family, and spend time with them, enjoying life and guiding them as they become of age and make decisions on their own.”

His one piece of advice? “Enjoy life.”

I Am A CEO With Stage 4 Cancer – And I Know Being Positive Is A Choice

Marshall said he’s become something of a mentor to his peers and colleagues, and the one question they always ask him is, “how do you stay so positive?”

And the answer is simple: positivity is intentional.

“I have had many challenges throughout my life that shaped me to be the man I am today,” Marshall said.

“From birth, being born with a cleft palate, the surgeries, the speech delays. I had a drive to overcome these challenges. As I look back, I realise these were all lessons that are helping me today with my current cancer challenge.”

And while his cancer diagnosis might be out of his control, the key to staying positive is to focus on what you can control.

“I don’t just take what my doctor tells me. If I did, it would be hard to stay positive,” he said. “Instead, I focus on what I can control – my diet, my attitude, exercise, life balance, and I am not afraid to change directions if needed.”

“I still have bad days, and sometimes we need to feel those feelings, but I don’t dwell on them. I let them come and then I get up and get moving.”

Click to read: I’m a CEO with stage 4 cancer. Here’s what I can tell you about life

Source: Yahoo

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Is A Lateral Move Bad For Your Career?

Worklife Daily_Is a Lateral Move Bad For Your Career

Click to read: Is A Lateral Move Bad For Your Career?

Source: Clearance Jobs

Snippet: Sometimes making a good career move does not always equate to moving upward. In some circumstances, the best move you can make is a lateral move.

We live in a society where we feel like if we are not moving up or moving forward constantly, that is a bad thing. Some call it being stuck in a rut or being in a funk, but it is not always a bad thing to find positions that are similar to your current title.

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Michelle Obama Talks About Failure, Work-Life Balance

Michelle Obama Talks Failure, Work-Life Balance and What She Tells Her Girls About Starting Out

Nathan Congleton/NBCU Photo Bank/NBCUniversal via Getty Images via Getty; Roy Rochlin/Getty Former First Lady Michelle Obama (left) and Valerie Jarrett /Michelle Obama Talks About Failure, Work-Life Balance

In the latest episode of her podcast, former First Lady Michelle Obama recounts her time in the workplace and why having women in leadership roles is so important.

Michelle Obama Talks About Life Switching Roles And Positive Impact To Leave Along

Wednesday’s episode between Obama, 56, and her former boss Valerie Jarrett, was a conversation that centers largely on work-life balance. Valerie went on to be a senior White House adviser.

Obama said that working with Jarrett, 63, served as a “important education.” This was not just because of the way Jarrett could command a room, but because of the effort she put in to taking time out for her daughter, Laura.

You may also like, Work-Family Balance Was Tough. Then The Pandemic Hit

“Seeing some other female leaders making an effort to balance work and family life, makes others more productive. It gives a feel like, not just work had values, but our lives had value”

Remembering her time spent working under Jarrett (then deputy chief of staff for Chicago Mayor Richard Daley), the former first lady said to Jarrett on The Michelle Obama Podcast: “If Laura called, everything stopped … And you wouldn’t rush her. You know, you would answer her little 5-year-old questions. And then you would say, ‘Mommy will be home.’ Then you’d turn back around without skippin’ a beat, and be right back in it, and I thought — baller! Baller.”

Seeing Jarrett and some of the other female leaders making an effort to balance work and family life, Obama said, “made us all more productive, and feel like not just our work had values but our lives had value.”

Michelle Obama’s Work Application Interview Performance Amidst Life Crossroads

In their chat for The Michelle Obama Podcast, the two also detailed their first meeting. This was when Jarrett interviewed Obama for a role at the Chicago mayor’s office in the early 1990s.

The two had similar backgrounds, having both come to the public sector after working for law firms.

“I have to tell you Michelle, I can still remember you walking into my office, and you were so, you know, composed and confident,” Jarrett said. “And what did you do? You told me your story, which is unusual for people to do in an interview.”

“Failure is all part of life. I never want young people to think that failure isn’t a part of everybody’s journey”

That story was about Obama finding herself at a crossroads. She had lost both her father and one of her close friends within a year and had determined that she wanted to pursue a new path. According to Jarrett, the interview left her so impressed that she offered Obama a job on the spot, even without having “any authority” to do so.

After leaving Chicago politics, Jarrett went on to work as an adviser to President Barack Obama, serving in his administration from 2009 until 2017.

An Important Pathway Before Landing A Leadership Role

On Wednesday’s podcast, Mrs. Obama also shared stories about her conversations with her own daughters — specifically, 22-year-old Malia, now finishing college. She talked about the importance of paying your dues when it comes to landing a leadership role.

“I tried to make the point to Malia that the young people … who are my mentees, I reminded her that they started out, several of them, in the campaign, doing some of the grunt-iest jobs,” Mrs. Obama said.

“We are living, breathing role models – not just in what we say, but what we do”

Many of those who once volunteered for the campaign, or did entry-level work, she said, are now working alongside the Obamas.

“But the people who are with me now, and who now have responsibilities over my schedule, or they’ve helped run a big book tour, or they are running, our higher ground productions and working with Netflix, almost all those people started out doing some grunt work,” she said, laughing.

Michelle Obama Talks About Failure As A Part Of Everybody’s Journey

Equally important to working ones way up the ladder, Obama added, is learning that failure is all part of life.

“I never want young people to think that failure isn’t a part of everybody’s journey,” she said, noting that she failed the bar exam the first time she sat for the test.

“What does it do for me if … some kid thinks I’ve never had a failure. That, that’s the only way you can be first lady, is if you’re perfect? No one is,” she said.

“Strong men – men who are truly role models – don’t need to put down women to make themselves feel powerful.”

Elsewhere in the episode, she and Jarrett spoke about the need to use their platforms to encourage others.

“We are living, breathing role models — not just in what we say, but what we do,” said the former first lady. She added later in the conversation that those with large platforms are “setting the tone for people behind us” and should always be aware of how their words and behaviors might be perceived.

The words echoed Mrs. Obama’s past remarks about role models.

In a 2016 speech while campaigning for Hilary Clinton, she offered a damning review of then-candidate Donald Trump‘s remarks about women. She said, “Strong men — men who are truly role models — don’t need to put down women to make themselves feel powerful.”

Myfwl/Work Life Feed has adapted the write up for our readers. Click here to view the original write up at www.yahoo.com

Why We Need To Practice Self-Compassion

Worklife Journal_Why We Need to Practice Self-Compassion

Click to read: Why We Need to Practice Self-Compassion

Source: Mindful

Snippet: In the frantic pace of life, it can be difficult to keep up. Sometimes when we make mistakes or we feel we don’t work hard enough, we leave ourselves in the dust by thinking things like, “you’re not good enough.” If we’re not careful, a few harsh words here and there can evolve into excessive self-criticism.

This five-minute video animation from the London School of Life suggests another way to approach those negative storylines we jog through our minds. It also offers an easy self-compassion practice for moments when we’re feeling critical of ourselves.

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How Great Leaders Bring Out Others’ Self-Confidence

Worklife Journal_How Great Leaders Bring Out Others’ Self-Confidence

Click to read: How Great Leaders Bring Out Others’ Self-Confidence

Source: Forbes

Snippet: Leaders inspire and enable others to do their absolute best together to realize a meaningful and rewarding shared purpose. Think in terms of why people follow you, what you do, and how you help those following you. On why people follow leaders, see -John Maxwell’s “The 5 Levels of Leadership.” To know what leaders do, read Jim Collins’ “Good to Great.”

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COVID-19 Legal HR Questions. Illegal If You Can’t Help?

COVID-19 Legal HR Questions. Illegal If You Can't Help

When it comes to HR legal issues these days, it’s all coronavirus all the time. COVID-19 legal HR questions that people can and will ask, should therefore be welcomed.

For the HR professional, navigating this seemingly endless and ever-changing legal maze can be quite daunting. Which issues are most important? What questions must I get answered? Where should my primary attention be?

“The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission has advised that employers excluding employees from the workplace on the basis of age are in violation of the Age Discrimination in Employment Act.”

Jathan Janove asked prominent employment law attorneys from around the United States to share their “favorite” COVID-19-related legal HR question. He also asked them to offer a suggestion or two on how to address it. Here’s what they had to say.

1. We’ve provided telework to our employees in response to COVID-19. Will that set a precedent for the future when an employee seeks telework as an accommodation under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA)?

According to Mark Tolman, an attorney with Jones Waldo in Salt Lake City, “it depends.”

Tolman explained that it is entirely plausible. That in post-pandemic times, an employee seeking telework as an ADA accommodation will point to the effectiveness of remote work during the pandemic.

The employee will point to this as evidence that onsite work is not essential or that telework does not impose an undue hardship.

As a practical matter, if your recent experience with telework is that it has been effective. That teleworkers have been able to productively accomplish all essential job duties. Such evidence likely will be used in the future to show that telework should be provided for an employee when necessary to accommodate a disability.”

You may also like, Career Trajectory On Ventilator, COVID Took My Ambition

However, you could have provided telework strictly out of pandemic necessity, and at the sacrifice of some essential duties.

Good communication can go a long way toward reducing anxiety and finding creative solutions that enable employees to remain productive while taking on the added role of at-home educator.”

Tolman said the mere provision of telework now, should not prevent you from arguing later. For example, that onsite work is essential or that telework imposes a hardship.

Three Key Actions to Support Employer’s Position

He suggested three actions HR professionals should take to better support an employer’s position that onsite work is required in the future:

  • When providing telework in response to COVID-19 concerns, notify employees in writing that telework is provided only in response to the pandemic. And that the company understands that its employees will not be able to perform all of the essential functions of their jobs while working remotely.
  • When employees return to onsite work, notify them in writing that the company looks forward to the resumption of all their essential job functions.
  • Review and revise job descriptions for onsite employees. If onsite work really is essential to a particular job, explain why such work is essential in the job description.

2. If schools don’t reopen in the fall or follow a hybrid model with in-person and remote learning, what leave will employees be entitled to?

There are uncertainty regarding whether and in what manner schools will reopen in the fall.

The opinion of Attorneys Rita Kanno and Diane Waters of Lewis Brisbois, in San Diego and Dallas comes handy. Respectively, they believe it is critical for employers to understand the evolving leave entitlements under federal, state and local law.

“Under the federal Families First Coronavirus Response Act [FFCRA]—which applies to employers with fewer than 500 employees—there are two ‘buckets’ of leave available for school or place-of-care closures or child care unavailability related to COVID-19: emergency paid sick leave and expanded family and medical leave. An employee can use both buckets for this type of leave, but only for up to a total of 12 weeks of leave.”

Kanno and Waters noted other applicable conditions to be eligible for this leave. Another “suitable individual,” such as a co-parent, co-guardian or the “usual child care provider” must not be available to provide the care the child needs.

If a school opens for in-person instruction, but an employee voluntarily chooses the remote learning option for his or her child, is FFCRA leave available?

According to Kanno and Waters, generally speaking, no.

Eligibility For FFCRA Leave – Role of Physical Location Of Where The Child Receives Instruction

“In order to be eligible for FFCRA leave, the physical location where the child receives instruction or care must be closed. If, however, the school is operating at reduced capacity to comply with social-distancing guidelines, such that the employee’s child has no choice but to receive remote learning, or if the school uses a hybrid model where in-person instruction is only provided on certain days of the week, FFCRA may be available.”

Kanno and Waters recommended that employers plan ahead by facilitating discussions with their employees. This is to learn how school reopening plans may impact their work schedules.

Whether remote work is or remains an option. And whether any added flexibility to their schedules, such as working around the school day or taking intermittent leave, may provide adequate solutions.

Good communication can go a long way toward reducing anxiety and finding creative solutions that enable employees to remain productive while taking on the added role of at-home educator.”

3. Our company has adopted a mandatory work-from-home policy in response to the global COVID-19 pandemic. What are best practices for compensating employees for the expenses they have incurred as a result of working from home?

The shift to remote work, which for many employees is a requirement rather than an employer-offered convenience, presents some questions. For example, the question of whether employers must reimburse employees for expenses incurred while working at home.

According to Eric Mackie, an attorney with Ogletree Deakins in Chicago, some states require employers to reimburse employees for expenditures. This includes expenditures incurred by the employee in direct consequence of the discharge of his or her employment duties.

Mackie also noted that under the Fair Labor Standards Act and its implementing regulations, employers are generally required to reimburse expenses incurred if those expenses would result in compensation below the federal minimum wage.

To minimize litigation exposure, Mackie said, employers should evaluate their employee expense reimbursement practices and refine or develop legally compliant policies.

Such policies could include, for example, a requirement for advance approval for any expenses over a specified amount. In all cases, effective communication and clear guidelines are key.”

4. Can I tell employees who are over age 65 to stay home from work for their own protection?

According to Jacqueline Cookerly Aguilera, an attorney with Morgan, Lewis & Bockius in Los Angeles, the answer is no.

She noted that initially, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said people over age 65 were at high risk for developing severe illness from COVID-19.

Now, the CDC uses an age gradient. Meaning that the risk for severe illness increases with age. The older the person, the greater the risk. For example, those in their 70s are at greater risk than those in their 50s.

Employee Exclusion Base on Greater Risk Of Contracting Serious Illness

“Regardless, an employer should not exclude an older employee from the workplace merely because the employee is at a greater risk for serious illness than a younger employee. Even if the reason is to protect the employee.”

The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission has advised that employers excluding employees from the workplace on the basis of age are in violation of the Age Discrimination in Employment Act.

However, certain state and local sick-leave laws may require an employer to reasonably accommodate an employee who requests an accommodation for COVID-19 reasons based on age.

“But even absent state or city laws,” Cookerly Aguilera said, “I nonetheless recommend that employers offer to accommodate any employee who may be more susceptible to serious illness from COVID-19. Either by allowing them to telework or, if that’s not possible, providing them unpaid leave.” 

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The above is a reformatted version of the original. The original write up is by Jathan Janove, J.D. and it is available on the SHRM Weblink below.

SHRM, the Society for Human Resource Management, provides content as a service to its readers and members. It does not offer legal advice, and cannot guarantee the accuracy or suitability of its content for a particular purpose. Disclaimer. Access to some SHRM resources may be limited by membership.

Go to SHRM Weblink for more on 4 COVID-19 Legal Questions You Should Answer

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