Tag Archives: despair

Worklife Crafting Because Worklife Cannot Be Balanced

Work-Life Daily_ WORKLIFE CRAFTING BECAUSE WORKLIFE CANNOT BE BALANCED

Once in a while, I get called to make contributions to LinkedIn conversations around work-life balance. And there was this LinkedIn post that goes like this, “I don’t believe in work-life balance. The word, balance, seems binary and implies taking from one in favor of another. I think of life as a puzzle. Time is limited, so I carefully choose the most important pieces to craft the kind of life I want to live, and everything else stays on the table.” Guess what jumped at me, worklife crafting!

“You have the option of carefully choosing the most important pieces to craft the kind of life you want to live.”

The post was by Irina Gerry. But it is what Ariel wrote that touched me further. It practically summed up for me, what it means to be doing worklife crafting because work-life cannot be balanced.

The Most Important Pieces To Craft

“I love the way you think Irina Gerry“, Ariel started. “For a while now, I’ve felt the term “work-life balance” is outdated because it implies that there is a standard that applies equally to everyone. Before I had kids, I was shamed for investing so much time in passionately pursuing and giving everything to a career I loved. But I felt balanced, because I was inspired, and motivated by a sense of purpose,” she said.

“Years later,” she continued, “I realized that pace was weighing on me and I needed to reassess my priorities for the season I was in and pivot. I refocused my time on being a better leader and building a legacy I could be proud of. Once I had kids, I realized I couldn’t do it all. And that I needed to make tough choices about how I invested my time. I said no more. I set boundaries. My friendships changed.”

At this point, I could feel the pain, re-echoed so quite often. The echo and tough choices that women always have to make.

Ariel thereafter took a six-month break to just BE with her newborn and she also volunteered at her church. Along the way, she learned that work-life balance is not as simple to achieve as the term may suggest. She concluded that “ultimately, achieving true “balance” was up to me to own.”

Hopefully, someone will learn from her through this post. Ariel did not hide the pain she went through during the journey. “It’s hard,” she said, “and I’m still figuring it out.” And for the rainbow after the thunderous heavy downpour, she concludes that she, “love the mindset of carefully choosing the most important pieces to craft the kind of life you want to live.”

The Hardest Is Deciding What Not To Be Involved In

Sunny also so much love the shared perspective. For her, she has learned that having the courage to say “no” to things and deciding what not to be involved in or spend time on has been the hardest. “There is a feeling of being judged or not feeling like you’re doing enough. But, at the end of the day, I’m learning to focus on the things that truly matter to me and my family, and how we can all help contribute to a better society,” she wrote.

“So dear friends, find the elements of your own worklife puzzle, and fix the jigsaw.”

Whatever we want to do, it is up to us as individuals to act. But not to go on naive, we need to know that there is going to be pain and joy to face. For example, some have chosen not to have children because they are afraid, not knowing how to reconcile parenting with professional life. This possibly is not a fantastic choice for some others, since “family” is a great part of life for them.

We all, therefore, have a great challenge, as those charting the narrative of this generation, to find a way to reconcile all the pieces of the puzzle in our lives. So that despite the odds loaded up so high against us, we can still ensure we have a prosperous and healthy life.

Find Your Own Life Puzzle

So dear friends, find the elements of your own worklife puzzle, and fix the jigsaw. Time is a very unique resource. It is the one and the only resource that is divided equally between rich and poor, young and old. And we are all given enough for each person’s worklife crafting to be done. So, from now on, your whole life living, the rest of your worklife puzzle is up to you!

I carefully choose the most important pieces to craft the kind of life I want to live, and everything else stays on the table.

Priority is key. Be thoughtful about what matters most, and be ruthless about everything else. You do not need to make trade-offs. But you have to make choices. And after you have made your choices, live in peace with them until the time comes to make new choices. Happy worklife crafting!


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When The World Sink, Will You Escape Up, Down Or Get Vaccinated?

WHEN THE WORLD SINK, WILL YOU ESCAPE UP, DOWN OR GET VACCINATED

When the world sink into a rage and go down into nuclear wars. That is, before the survivors start to eat the dead, and the warriors no longer have a commander. Will you escape up, down or get vaccinated?

At a time when a little unseen virus hunts down mankind; and panic strikes every heart. When Kings and Nobles respects themselves, maintaining simple protocol you order a child around to do. Wash your hands before you eat. Don’t swipe your mouth and face with your dirty fingers after playing all day out side.

Just when countries are competing to announce the immediate deployment of vaccines against COVID-19. Notwithstanding the death toll, there is the usual self defeating race of champions over corpses.

“Covid-19: Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine judged safe for use in UK from next week,” the BBC announces. “The scientists have done it,” says Boris Johnson as he hails vaccine approval. Britain therefore became the first Western country to allow mass inoculations against the coronavirus, granting emergency approval to Pfizer’s vaccine.

The Economic Times headline screams, “Putin asks his govt to start mass COVID-19 vaccinations in Russia next week.”

And when you think the “world policeman” will let this moment pass by without a show of presence, the New York Times reported that the US Center for Disease Control (C.D.C.) has recommended that nursing homes and health workers should get the vaccines first. That is coming few days after drugmaker Moderna said it is seeking emergency authorization in the United States and Europe to distribute its coronavirus vaccine. According to VOANews, the latest tests results showed it is 94% effective.

Elon Musk’s SpaceX’s And The Journey To Mass

SpaceX’s CEO Elon Musk says humans will land on Mars in four to six years.

“Perhaps a Nobel peace prize is a single ‘vaccine’ shot to address world conflicts. But it is definitely not enough. Multiple shots are required. Especially since the world problems mutate like a coronavirus.”

Robert Vicino’s Vivos And The Journey To Super-safe Underground Bunkers

You should have heard of the existence of underground cities. And interconnecting tunnels like underground train links, that takes the powerful to safety far away from calamity. And if your neighbor doesn’t have a backyard bunker, you must have heard of at least a president or military personnel that have taken refuge in one. But Robert Vicino is preparing a city of bunkers so that some people can survive a nuclear rage to rebuild the world, perhaps a year after the wars.

Hooray! Now We Can Focus On Other Problems

Now that we have found vaccines to deal with the world’s current and most troubling problem, the COVID-19 pandemic, perhaps we should not fear that the world may sink again.

Practically, the whole world went into a lock down. And global effort went into finding a solution in earnest. Therefore, just as fast and focused as the world have fought against this pandemic, in the same way, a vaccination (sorry, solution) should be found against climate change; then malaria, world hunger, inequalities, conflicts and wars. Perhaps a Nobel peace prize is a single ‘vaccine’ shot to address world conflicts. But it is definitely not enough. Multiple shots are required. Especially since the world problems mutate like a coronavirus.

But what of the logistics challenge in delivering such potent solution to the worlds myriad of problems? And the enormous cost that poor nations will have to bear. Who will get the first shots – and enjoy peace, good health and begin to overcome aging?

COVID-19 Vaccines, Conflicts And The Great Reset

Sorry, breaking news. War just broke out in the Strait of Hormuz. Special ships carrying vaccines through one of the world’s most important shipping routes have been attacked. It is suspected that the ships are not carrying vaccines but suspicious cargoes meant to be used to destabilize the region. This is a drill. I repeat. This is a drill!

But just then, Elon Musk’s SpaceX blast off to Mars, carrying a few privileged aristocrats.

Robert Vicino’s Vivos company was having a hard time pushing back the wealthy who are flashing their Black American Express card. “Any amount in gold bars, cryptocurrency or raw cash, just to have a safe passage while the world sink,” they plead. Yes, even when the world burns daily, while the poor go to bed hungry, and the middle class work their life out, the few privileged ones are in the world’s safe cocoons. Secure and profiting from the worlds stress and daily calamities. Whaoh, what a great bet, the stock exchange just had a bull run. Wine filled glass cups clings, cheers.

Life and all it’s confusion, trappings and allure! Worklife, and it’s dangerous offerings, surreptitiously used to hold workers captive, with the goodies of work, all of their life. Work-Life balance, a legitimate desire, a pursuit in hope! It is time to reset and find, or possibly rediscover the purpose of this journey of life.

Thanks McKinsey, before the world sink, there is a COVID-19 and the great reset! Thanks.

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Walking Away From A Bullying Client Who Causes Your Team To Suffer

Walking Away From A Bullying Client Who Cause Our Team To Suffer

Click to read: Walking Away From A Bullying Client Who Causes Our Team To Suffer

Source: Campaign Asia

Snippet: We were working with our largest client at the time. And we were giving everything to service an account worth £1m. Sadly, we found out that our team members were being destroyed by the negative values that this client held. Also by the way he was treating our team. Unfortunately, some of our team members were already living with mental health challenges. And I had also had a mini-stroke and heart surgery since starting the company.

Consequently when we were deciding on what action to take, we chose to put our employees first. We walked away from the account.

Just because we showed where our company’s values were, we gave our employees a better work-life balance and a healthier mindset. This simple action also meant that clients will receive a much higher standard of service from the team.

Corporate Kindness

When people are supported, they enjoy coming to work. This ultimately leads to increased productivity. And that is why I co-founded “Corporate Kindness,” an initiative to encourage companies to lead with kindness.

A great example of “Corporate Kindness” was the open letter by Brian Chesky, chief executive of Airbnb. In the letter, he explained how the company arrived at its decision to downsize and who to let go. He also talked about how the company was supporting those it could no longer employ by helping them to find other jobs.

Corporate kindness can help employees know when to make the call and start walking away from a bullying client. Studies have shown that kindness improves productivity. It also lowers employee recruitment and training costs.

Kelly Allison is chief executive of digital and brand experience agency KVA. Also co-founder of #CorporateKindness

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There is No Such Thing as an Easy Job

There is no such thing as an easy job

In “There’s No Such Thing as an Easy Job,” author Kikuko Tsumura details the everyday struggles of modern life, focusing on our complicated relationships with work.

Taking her place among a growing number of exceptional female writers in Japan, Tsumura deftly handles work habits and relationships, stereotypes and expectations for success. She sets all of these against a repetitious, unending search for what is valuable and valued. The novel unfolds as a profound meditation on contemporary society and what makes work meaningful.

The novel’s unnamed narrator is 36 years old and single. She has no choice but to move in with her parents after quitting her 14-year career due to burnout syndrome. When her unemployment insurance runs out, she prepares to reenter the workforce with a dry matter-of-factness. Saying, “I’d sat down one day in front of my recruiter and informed her that I wanted a job as close as possible to my house. Ideally, something along the lines of sitting all day in a chair, overseeing the extraction of collagen for use in skincare products.”

There’s No Such Thing as an Easy Job

In her attempts to find work that is meaningless and undemanding, the narrator goes through five jobs over the course of a year.

In one role, she checks surveillance footage of a novelist who has unknowingly received priceless gems in a covert smuggling scheme. She then works as an assistant to an enigmatic Ms. Eriguchi in another job, writing pre-recorded advertisements. Taking on a ‘leadership’ role, she fills in for Mr. Kiyota. His life work is creating enlightening content to go on rice cracker packages. But at a point, he had to take a mental health break after failing to find a wife.

Whereas putting up posters in a neighborhood as a job may seem nothing glamorous, that is until it gets competitive. She inadvertently gains a mysterious adversary who posts competing signage. Finally in her last of five jobs rounds, she joins a national park’s maintenance crew. Her job is to monitor the forest from a small hut, surrounded by peculiarities such as a local soccer team’s lost apparel, missing breadfruit and a book from her pre-burnout life.

“I’d like it if this would help readers to know that even if they encounter feelings of despair in their working lives, it doesn’t have to be the end. Something else will come around.”

The narrator navigates each workplace’s demands and relationships with various coworkers. Gradually she becomes aware of a meaning underlying all endeavors in life, even those that seem bizarre. Each of the jobs, despite the increasingly absurd series of events, validates the interconnectedness of all actions.

It’s the kind of novel that presents a swathe of tangled threads, trusting the reader to weave together the connections on their own.

How Hard Is It To Find Meaning In The Modern Workplace?

“I was first drawn to the boldness of the concept. I remember reading a summary before reading the text itself and just thinking, ‘There’s no way that something like that can work,’” says translator Barton in an interview with The Japan Times. “And then I found myself as a reader so drawn in, just wanting to immerse in that world forever. It seemed like such a coup. Given that it was a book entirely about work. And we find out really nothing about the private life of the narrator,” says Barton.

The novel finishes with a dose of wisdom about karma, extolling trust in the “ups and downs” of the universe. The narrator solves the jewel smuggling caper. She observes the mysterious power of spoken words. And then creates meaning in the mundane, and subverts the activities of a cult.

Finally, she helps another victim of burnout syndrome to reenter society. All while taking steps in her own recovery toward essential work.

For Tsumura, who sets many of her stories within the realm of working life, the English publication of her book is well-timed. The ongoing pandemic and an increase in remote work has forced many people to reevaluate their working lives and how it affects their search for a fulfilling life.

Hope For The World Of Jobs, Work, Life, Satisfaction And Despair

Tsumura recently told Barton that, “The narrator changes jobs many times, experiencing both satisfaction and frustration. But ultimately, she keeps on moving forward. Sometimes voluntarily, and sometimes pushed on by her situation. I’d like it if this would help readers to know that even if they encounter feelings of despair in their working lives, it doesn’t have to be the end. Something else will come around.”


There’s No Such Thing as an Easy Job, by Kikuko Tsumura has 416 pages and is translated by Polly Barton.

In a time of both misinformation and too much information, quality journalism is more crucial than ever. By subscribing to Japan Times (the first place where the original of this write up was first featured), you can help them get more story right.

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Welcome to Worklife Feed articles and site-files indexing and adaptation series.