Tag Archives: career growth

Right Mentoring For Success In Career And Leadership

RIGHT MENTORING FOR SUCCESS IN CAREER AND LEADERSHIP

A right mentoring relationship can be a powerful tool for professional growth. It can lead to a new job, a promotion, or even a better work-life balance. But what does it take to be a great mentor or mentee? How do mentees find mentors to meet their career goals?

To find answers, hook up to an upcoming event with a right mentoring package – the Pennsylvania State University School of Public Policy offer. They are getting set to developing the next generation of problem solvers and leaders.

“A mentor is someone who sees more talent and ability within you, than you see in yourself, and helps bring it out of you.”

Bob Proctor

Right Mentoring As A Strategy For Career And Leadership Success

PENN States’s School of Public Policy offers a monthly professional development series called, “Strategies for Career and Leadership Success.” The next event will address the power of mentoring relationships. It will be starting at 11:30 a.m. on Wednesday, Nov. 11. See below for more details about how to register for the event.

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Since June 2020, the PENN States’s professional development series has been helping students, recent graduates, and current professionals develop their career and leadership skills. The program provides opportunities to learn skills related to interviewing, professional presence, and how to maximize the internship experience. Participants also learn how to build organizational relationships, and more.

The November 11 mentoring session will be led by 2013 Penn State alumnus Jeremy O’Mard. He earned his bachelor’s degree in management information systems with a minor in operations and supply chain management. Currently, he is a managing consultant in the Managed Services and Cloud Solutions Practice of IBM Global Business Services. And he has worked with commercial, state government, and federal government agencies, serving in both technical and operational roles.

O’Mard’s Career Kick-start And FastStart Mentorship Program

During the event, O’Mard will discuss the mentorship process from mentor and mentee perspectives. Using his experience, he will be providing advice for identifying a mentor, and strategies for making the relationship work.

O’Mard said his involvement with mentoring began when he joined the FastStart Mentorship Program during his senior year at Penn State.

FastStart typically matches first-year students from underrepresented backgrounds with a faculty/staff mentor and a Penn State alumni mentor. This is a program that is designed to help students flourish in their new environment. It works through a simple process of answering questions, directing students to resources, offering support and wisdom, and providing informal networks for career development.

“If you cannot see where you are going, ask someone who has been there before.”

J Loren Norris

There is great benefit in horizontal peer to peer mentoring. However, the type of mentoring most people look out for, is a mentor they admire. Most times, someone who is a senior to them. Take time to explore this Harvard Business Review article if you want to build a mentoring relationship with a leader that you admire.

Passing On Lessons Learnt

“I remember the many lessons that I learned during the first half of my college career. And I thought it would be great if I could help incoming students navigate the college landscape. Especially students from underrepresented communities or disadvantaged backgrounds,” said O’Mard. “My first stint as a mentor was an eye-opening and enriching experience. It was great to know that my mentee was able to apply some of the tips that I provided.”

After graduating, O’Mard continued to serve as a mentor in the FastStart program. He says he enjoyed both teaching and learning from his mentees and consequently became involved as both a mentor and a mentee at IBM.

“Ironically, one of my mentees [at IBM] is a student at Penn State,” he said. “I can honestly say that I have learned a lot, personally and professionally, serving as both a mentor and a mentee, and I would encourage others to get involved with mentoring.”

Take Action To Advance Your Personal Development

The upcoming conversation will be held via Zoom and consist of a brief interview followed by questions from the audience. Participants will have the option to ask questions during the live discussion or by email in advance of the presentation to publicpolicy@psu.edu.

For more information about the series and to RSVP for the Nov. 11 session, visit publicpolicy.psu.edu/careerstrategies. A Zoom link will be sent to all registrants in advance of the event.

Learn more about mentoring, personal development and various effective ways of learning through imentoring mentoring group. You can also get free Linda Phillips-Jones mentoring books collections.

Welcome to Worklife Feed articles and site-files indexing and adaptation series.

Ruth Bader Ginsburg Best Career Advice In One Sentence

Ruth Bader Ginsburg Delivered The Best Career Advice You'll Ever Hear, In Just One Sentence

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Getty Images for Berggruen Institute

With the passing of the iconic Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, many Americans have poured encomiums on her. Some wants her memory to be a blessing, others have formed an RBG hashtag revolution. The hashtag followers are promising to fight every day, as did #RBG to achieve #EqualityForAll.

RBG (Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg) was until recently, the United States Supreme Court Justice. She is acclaimed to have lived an amazing life, impacting the lives of others before she died at 87, September 2020. She was appointed in 1993 by President Bill Clinton.

People were drawn to her for different reasons. For some, it is how she consistently delivered progressive votes on the most divisive social issues of the day. Issues such as abortion rights, same-sex marriage, voting rights, immigration, health care and affirmative action. Will a career advise from her take you from good to great?

Insight and nuggets of career advice from her can actually apply to everyone, regardless of career stage.

Ruth Bader Ginsburg And A Good Career Advice

Four years ago, Ruth Bader Ginsburg wrote an article in the New York Times in which she offered her advice for living.

In the article, she says: “Another often-asked question when I speak in public: “Do you have some good advice you might share with us?” Yes, I do. It comes from my savvy mother-in-law, advice she gave me on my wedding day.

“In every good marriage,” she counseled, “it helps sometimes to be a little deaf. I have followed that advice assiduously, and not only at home through 56 years of a marital partnership nonpareil. I have employed it as well in every workplace, including the Supreme Court. When a thoughtless or unkind word is spoken, best tune out. Reacting in anger or annoyance will not advance one’s ability to persuade.”

“It helps to be a little deaf”

Her line, “it helps to be a little deaf,” might just be the best piece of career advice ever given. And, like so many of her insights, her intuition is firmly supported by research. Being deaf to thoughtless and unkind words is essential to having a successful and fulfilling career.

Resilience, Response To Criticism And Letting Go

For example, tens of thousands have taken the online test “How Do You React To Constructive Criticism?” And we’ve learned that, when receiving tough feedback, fewer than a quarter of people are really able to let go of their anger and start moving forward.

But those who can respond effectively to tough feedback (i.e., tuning out the unkind words) are 42% more likely to love their job.

Research has also shown that people who do well at forgiving others (i.e. letting go of their anger and resentment) typically experience fewer negative physical health symptoms, like disorders of the cardiovascular or immune system.

Being able to tune out the thoughtless words you’re guaranteed to hear, isn’t just important to keep yourself psychologically healthy, it’s also a necessary ingredient for resilience. That is, one’s ability to bounce back quickly from failure, adversity, stress, etc.

“If you can keep yourself from perseverating on unkind words hurled in your direction, you’re far more likely to pick yourself up, dust yourself off, and go right back to what you were doing.”

Resilient Like A Ruth Bader Ginsburg?

And we need resilience right now. Data from the online Resiliency Test has discovered that fewer than a quarter of people have high resilience right now (you may want to test your own resilience).

In the study Employee Engagement Is Less Dependent On Managers Than You Think, 11,308 employees were surveyed about their engagement at work. And the study revealed that employees’ self-engagement (i.e. their personal outlooks like resilience, optimism, proactivity, etc.) can actually matter more than working for a great manager.

One of the discoveries from the study is that employees with high resilience are 310% more likely to love their jobs than employees with low resilience. And 136% more than employees with even moderate resilience.

Whether you want greater success or more happiness, whether you work from home or in an office, everything begins with Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s timeless and elegantly simple words, “it helps sometimes to be a little deaf.”

How The Pursuit Of Audacious Goals Can Marry Thoughtless Or Unkind Words

Anyone who pursues big or audacious goals (like being the second woman to serve on the U.S. Supreme Court) is going to hear some thoughtless or unkind words. To help yourself, tune out those words, and implement Ginsburg’s advice, here’s a little trick.

“Reacting in anger or annoyance will not advance one’s ability to persuade.”

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Whenever someone hurls some unkind words your way, ask yourself, “What are the facts here?” Set aside the other person’s emotions (e.g., their anger, resentment, accusations, jealousy, etc.). Then, listen only for whether there are any facts.

Living A Remarkable Life, The Ruth Bader Ginsburg Way

Imagine someone says to me, “you’re an idiot for thinking that project would work, you didn’t even calculate an ROI. Only a moron would do something that stupid.”

There are plenty of unkind words in that diatribe. But there’s also a fact, namely, that I didn’t calculate an ROI. So I will take that fact (which is quite useful) and focus on it to the exclusion of the unkind words. By staying factual, we stay calmer. We’re then better to discern the one or two nuggets that are often contained within even the most thoughtless and unkind comments.

Ruth Bader Ginsburg led a remarkable life. And while we might not equal her legendary career heights, we can all apply her advice. We can be a little deaf to thoughtless and unkind words. As she notes, “Reacting in anger or annoyance will not advance one’s ability to persuade.”

Myfwl/Work Life Feed has adapted the write up for our readers. Click here to view the original write up at www.forbes.com

5 Hidden Opportunities When Your Job Has Lost Its Spark

5 Hidden Opportunities When Your Job Has Lost Its Spark

Click to read: 5 Hidden Opportunities When Your Job Has Lost Its Spark

Source: Forbes

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Welcome to Worklife Feed

Snippets: When we consider whether we like our jobs, the actual work isn’t always – if ever – the first thing we focus on. There are so many factors and details that comprise our days. There’s our local barista when we pick up our morning coffee. There’s the commute where we listen to podcasts or music or just sit in silence in contrast to the chaos of children back home.

Many might find – and are finding – that the bones left of a job had been so well clothed pre-quarantine that they had never fully considered how much they did – or didn’t – enjoy the job itself.

Rather than get depressed about this realization, use it as an opportunity. You now have a chance to reignite your love affair with your job or figure out what you’d rather do. Both are upsides; you are being given insight that can improve your […].

Forget Work-Life Balance: What Companies Need To Know Now About Work-Life Effectiveness

Forget Work-Life Balance: What Companies Need To Know Now About Work-Life Effectiveness

What do we really need about work-life: a balance, more effectiveness at work or a better blend of work and life? Do we just need to invest more into life and not work? Or since some are afraid of loosing their job or the next raise, we should just invest more in our work, taking the spiral back to an imbalance with life?

The conversation is on and getting hotter. Thanks to a pandemic that made almost everyone to invest more into life and family – by working from home. Though with excess time capacity, we could not do much of fun stuffs the way we do traditionally. The last few months have also transformed where, when and how we work, breaking down the tenuous barriers that separated our personal and professional lives. In addition to this […]

Click here to view original web page at www.forbes.com

The Importance of Balancing a Healthy Work & Personal-life To Achieve Success

The Importance of Balancing a Healthy Work & Personal-life To Achieve Success

Life is similar to walking on a tightrope, where we have to skillfully balance our career and personal life to reach our goal successfully. Our work-life and our personal life are two very important pillars. While work allows us […]

Click here to view original web page at www.entrepreneur.com