Category Archives: myMentor

Right Mentoring For Success In Career And Leadership

RIGHT MENTORING FOR SUCCESS IN CAREER AND LEADERSHIP

A right mentoring relationship can be a powerful tool for professional growth. It can lead to a new job, a promotion, or even a better work-life balance. But what does it take to be a great mentor or mentee? How do mentees find mentors to meet their career goals?

To find answers, hook up to an upcoming event with a right mentoring package – the Pennsylvania State University School of Public Policy offer. They are getting set to developing the next generation of problem solvers and leaders.

“A mentor is someone who sees more talent and ability within you, than you see in yourself, and helps bring it out of you.”

Bob Proctor

Right Mentoring As A Strategy For Career And Leadership Success

PENN States’s School of Public Policy offers a monthly professional development series called, “Strategies for Career and Leadership Success.” The next event will address the power of mentoring relationships. It will be starting at 11:30 a.m. on Wednesday, Nov. 11. See below for more details about how to register for the event.

You may also like; Yale Young Global Scholars (YYGS) 2021 Program

Since June 2020, the PENN States’s professional development series has been helping students, recent graduates, and current professionals develop their career and leadership skills. The program provides opportunities to learn skills related to interviewing, professional presence, and how to maximize the internship experience. Participants also learn how to build organizational relationships, and more.

The November 11 mentoring session will be led by 2013 Penn State alumnus Jeremy O’Mard. He earned his bachelor’s degree in management information systems with a minor in operations and supply chain management. Currently, he is a managing consultant in the Managed Services and Cloud Solutions Practice of IBM Global Business Services. And he has worked with commercial, state government, and federal government agencies, serving in both technical and operational roles.

O’Mard’s Career Kick-start And FastStart Mentorship Program

During the event, O’Mard will discuss the mentorship process from mentor and mentee perspectives. Using his experience, he will be providing advice for identifying a mentor, and strategies for making the relationship work.

O’Mard said his involvement with mentoring began when he joined the FastStart Mentorship Program during his senior year at Penn State.

FastStart typically matches first-year students from underrepresented backgrounds with a faculty/staff mentor and a Penn State alumni mentor. This is a program that is designed to help students flourish in their new environment. It works through a simple process of answering questions, directing students to resources, offering support and wisdom, and providing informal networks for career development.

“If you cannot see where you are going, ask someone who has been there before.”

J Loren Norris

There is great benefit in horizontal peer to peer mentoring. However, the type of mentoring most people look out for, is a mentor they admire. Most times, someone who is a senior to them. Take time to explore this Harvard Business Review article if you want to build a mentoring relationship with a leader that you admire.

Passing On Lessons Learnt

“I remember the many lessons that I learned during the first half of my college career. And I thought it would be great if I could help incoming students navigate the college landscape. Especially students from underrepresented communities or disadvantaged backgrounds,” said O’Mard. “My first stint as a mentor was an eye-opening and enriching experience. It was great to know that my mentee was able to apply some of the tips that I provided.”

After graduating, O’Mard continued to serve as a mentor in the FastStart program. He says he enjoyed both teaching and learning from his mentees and consequently became involved as both a mentor and a mentee at IBM.

“Ironically, one of my mentees [at IBM] is a student at Penn State,” he said. “I can honestly say that I have learned a lot, personally and professionally, serving as both a mentor and a mentee, and I would encourage others to get involved with mentoring.”

Take Action To Advance Your Personal Development

The upcoming conversation will be held via Zoom and consist of a brief interview followed by questions from the audience. Participants will have the option to ask questions during the live discussion or by email in advance of the presentation to publicpolicy@psu.edu.

For more information about the series and to RSVP for the Nov. 11 session, visit publicpolicy.psu.edu/careerstrategies. A Zoom link will be sent to all registrants in advance of the event.

Learn more about mentoring, personal development and various effective ways of learning through imentoring mentoring group. You can also get free Linda Phillips-Jones mentoring books collections.

Welcome to Worklife Feed articles and site-files indexing and adaptation series.

Build A Mentoring Relationship With A Leader You Admire

BUILD A MENTORING RELATIONSHIP WITH A LEADER YOU ADMIRE

image: trumzz/Getty Images/Build A Mentoring Relationship With A Leader You Admire

Years ago when I taught a graduate leadership course in Seattle, one of my students asked me to be his mentor. This was about a week after the class had ended. It was clear that the question was difficult for him. Throughout the course, he appeared disinterested in my teaching, aloof, and often scoffed at the materials I presented. I’d assumed that he didn’t like the course or me.

But what caught me off guard that day was his sincerity. He explained that he’d had some bad experiences with mentors in the past. He came to realize that the people he had reached out to and admired weren’t genuinely interested in helping him grow. And they usually wanted something in return: free labor, an ego boost, the chance to feel important.

Trusting someone he wanted to learn from was still difficult. But he’d found the courage to ask me anyway. His vulnerability was disarming. I’d never been formally asked to “mentor” anyone and I felt like a fraud. I feared that if he knew my many flaws and insecurities, I’d end up being yet another disappointment.

Reluctantly, I agreed and decided I could simply hide those parts of myself.

Trust, Vulnerability And Growth In Mentoring Relationships

It wasn’t until months later, when we had built a foundation of trust, that I felt comfortable enough to follow his example. Sick of carrying around my angst, I confessed my fears about being the “perfect” mentor. As it turned out, the last thing he wanted was my perfection. He wanted me to be human, to see how I dealt with my shortfalls, and grew to trust me more because I acknowledged them.

I tell this story because I understand how complicated relationships between different generations can be in academic and professional settings. We spend a great deal of time comparing what we each have to offer to one another, and to the world.

In academia, young students want professors to help them make sense of the world. While their professors are worried about keeping up with their publishing demands.

At work, many emerging leaders feel those senior to them stand in their way. While those in senior roles privately question their relevance in the face of younger, tech-savvy newcomers. Such is the dilemma that both sides faces in an effort to build a mentoring relationship.

It Is Beyond The Legacy Or Wisdom Of Older Leaders, We Need Each Other

The irony is that the legacy of older leaders is only secured through helping the young ones reach their potential. And the opportunity to fulfill your potential as a young leader can be realized much more fully if you make an effort to inherit the wisdom of your predecessors. We need each other to feel like we both matter.

If a senior leader you want to connect with hasn’t figured that out yet, there are ways to help them, as my mentee helped me. Of course, all generations have more work to do in this area. These connections can only be made if both sides build bridges and make an effort to understand our mutual wants and differences.

But right now, I want to empower you, the young leader, with a few tools that I’ve seen help lay the foundation.

Test Your Assumptions And Labels. 

Chances are, if you’ve struggled to connect with a particular older leader, you’ve formed biases about them. You may have interpreted some of their behavior as off-putting, unapproachable, or disinterested in you. While your concerns may very well be valid, it’s also important to check yourself before completely writing them off.

I initially interpreted my student’s aloofness as disinterest. When in fact, it was the opposite. You may be surprised by what you find when you dig a little deeper.

Before shutting the door on a relationship with an older employee, put yourself in their shoes. Could you be misinterpreting where they are coming from? Are you projecting some of your own anxiety or misgivings onto them?

If you have any connection with someone who knows them better, check in with them to find out more to test your beliefs. Make sure that your criteria for judging their behavior isn’t based on how similar or different they are from you. The things that are different about them, may end up being the most valuable.

Use Vulnerability, Not Just Confidence, To Build Credibility

Many emerging leaders feel the best way to win the approval of older leaders is to appear confident, smart, and assertive. But that can backfire. It can come across as entitled or overly self-assured.

After asking me to be his mentor, my graduate student went on to confess that his behavior during our class was his way of trying to prove that he didn’t need help. He told me, “It’s funny, I was looking to be developed and led by trying to convince both of us that I needed neither.” His humility deeply impressed me.

What will show more seasoned leaders your maturity and credibility is being vulnerable. Being able to openly talk about what you don’t know. Asking for help in places you feel unsure, and acknowledging areas you need to improve. While that may feel risky, older leaders know that there’s only so much legitimately earned confidence, someone who is early in their career will have. Faking more than you have will only make others less likely to trust you.

Demonstrating that you know your limitations by being confident enough to ask for help indicates you are trustworthy and open to learning. If you are struggling with a project, for instance, you might say, “I’d love to get your input on this. I’m feeling really good about these parts, but I haven’t had enough experience in this area and I know that it’s your expertise.”

Avoid Complete Deference

On the other hand, extreme deference can create distance. In some cases, it can make you come across as a suck up. In others, it establishes a formality that makes senior leaders feel as though they always have to “be on” when they are around you.

Believe it or not, deference triggers a sense of imposter syndrome, a fear many older leaders have (that they aren’t worthy of the role they are in). This was my struggle in my relationship with my graduate student.

Recommended: Mentoring During A Crisis – Place Of Self And Mentee

You want to be someone that older leaders can feel safe with. Someone who they can be themselves around. When leaders across generations can learn to be vulnerable with one another, it can be transformational.

Find Common Ground

What many emerging leaders long for is to feel respected by older leaders.

Creating “peership” with older leaders — approaching them as equals without being cocky and showing respect for their seniority without being overly deferent — is one of the hardest parts of these relationships.

To establish mutuality, learn about their lives outside of work. If they have pictures of their family in their office, ask about them. Or, if you’re on a video call and one of their kids walks in the room, use that chance to learn more about their life. To build a mentoring relationship that will last long, also find out what interests they have outside of work.

When my student and I were first getting to know each other, I was still a newcomer to Seattle. My family and I were steeped in boxes from our move to the new city and he offered to help. As we unpacked boxes of books in my office, he asked about my clients and the work I did. It became a ritual for us to sit on the floor in front of the bookcase and tell stories of leaders facing real-life challenges.

Shared humanity is a great way to establish common ground, setting the foundation for a strong relationship. It also helps neutralize any hierarchical differences without ignoring them. You can show respect for your differences in experience by asking about their career choices and how they’ve approached their development.

Ask For What You Need

As simple as it sounds, seasoned leaders love when younger leaders cut to the chase and ask for what they want. If you want more time with someone, ask for it within reason. You probably can’t get an hour a week, but you might get an hour a month. With such baby steps, you will build a mentoring relationship that is fulfilling.

If you want more opportunities to have your ideas heard, ask for it. You can say, “I know our meetings are very full, but sharing my ideas is an area I need to grow in. Sometimes we move so fast that I don’t feel comfortable jumping into the fray. I wonder if we could set aside 15 minutes in an upcoming meeting for me to share an idea and engage the team?”

What Rejection Actually Mean

If you fear your request will be denied, you’re not alone. Many emerging leaders are afraid of the feeling of rejection that comes with that denial. Instead of personalizing silence, or a “no” answer, ask the other person to help you understand.

Whatever their response, they likely have your best interest in mind. You may have to ask several times to make something happen. This is why you should always ask with a level of respect, and explain why your request makes sense. Any hint of insistence, entitlement, or sulking if your request isn’t granted, is more likely to be met with resistance.

Remember that your desire to connect with more experienced colleagues is worthy and admirable. You are beginning to walk your way to build a mentoring relationship that is mutually beneficial. You are striving to learn from them, to offer something in return, and to broaden your network beyond your peers. Learning how to make those desires known to senior leaders takes practice, but it’s a skill you will use all your life.

It may feel risky, and at times, it will feel uncomfortable. But that discomfort is the same thing that will make your relationship go from enjoyable to transformational.

Start Now, Start Small. Keep It Friendly, Informal And Enjoyable

It takes some work to build a mentoring relationship. But you can start small. Who is a more experienced professional or leader that you admire? Someone you’d want to emulate? Whose career has made you think differently about your own?

Reach out to them. Let them know how they, and their work have influenced you. And then, ask for a 20-minute virtual coffee. Prepare one or two questions to ask them. Keep it friendly and informal. Let them feel enjoyed, and help them to enjoy you. Some of the greatest relationships of our lives start with a simple question over a cup of coffee.

Click to read the original script @ Harvard Business Review – Build a Relationship With a Senior Leader You Admire by Ron Carucci


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Mentoring During A Crisis – Place Of Self And Mentee

Mentoring During A Crisis - Place Of Self And Mentee

image: Westend61/Getty Images/Mentoring During A Crisis-Place Of Self And Mentee

Shortly after September 11, 2001, I (David) stood in the cafeteria line at work, anxieties still swirling in my mind. I happened to see one of my mentors, a senior member of our department. After we exchanged hellos, our conversation quickly turned to current events.

I remember he said two simple – yet powerful – words: “It’s scary.”

Almost instantly, my fears began to settle, replaced by a sense of connection. Knowing I wasn’t alone made a difference.

Even The Strong Need A Strong Hand Of Support

We have combined ~50 years of experience mentoring healthcare professionals before the Covid crisis. And now during it, we’ve learned just how important mentors can be—especially for those on the front lines.

For months, doctors, nurses, grocery store workers, postal carriers, and many others have been navigating physical danger, complexity, and uncertainty, with no end in sight. Now more than ever, they need emotional support.

But they can’t always turn to their managers. They also may be consumed with solving problems and likely overwhelmed with keeping their organizations running.

Workers may also fear their managers. They are the ones who hold the key to their future advancement. There is always the concern that managers may view  a request for help as a weakness. That is where you as a mentor can play a critical role. You can provide them with a stabilizing force. This is the time to be that someone who can help talk them down when they’re triggered, scared, burned out, or confused—all off the record.

Fortify Yourself First

However, if you consider yourself a mentor to someone on the front lines, the first step is to take care of yourself. You can’t offer emotional support if you don’t have your own emotional fortifications in place. Then you can turn to helping your mentee’s by offering them emotional support and concrete tactics.

First, you need to take stock of your capacity. Do you have the necessary time, focus, and energy for your mentee? If you don’t have time but still want to help, one solution is to help your mentee’s develop a  “team of mentors.”

If you do determine that you have the bandwidth to play a mentorship role, ask yourself: what can I do to fortify myself? Ultimately, you cannot provide care to others with an empty tank.

The Basics Are Not Luxuries But Essentials

Adequate sleep, nutrition, exercise, and activities that provide rejuvenation and meaning—such as meditation, prayer, nature walks, listening or playing music—are not luxuries; they are essential.  

Micro-practices such as keeping a gratitude journal, deep breathing, and moments of mindfulness such as when using hand sanitizer can build moments of wellness into your day. And they take only seconds to minutes to implement.

And just as your mentee benefits from having you and other mentors to support them, you need your own support network as well. Highly effective leaders lean on support teams of colleagues near or far, and good mentors do the same. Do this by scheduling regular check-in calls with friends, family, mentors, coaches, spiritual advisors, or mental health professionals.

Encourage Reverse Mentoring

In the same vein, keep in mind that your relationship with your mentee isn’t one-way. Being open to learning from your mentees can be a source of positive energy for both of you. Reverse mentoring can pay big dividends, both emotionally and practically.

Voicing your appreciation for these moments of exchange can also build your relationship and provide its own form of emotional support to your mentee.

Attend To Your Mentee’s Emotional Well-Being

In your work with your mentees, it may be tempting to focus on teaching them new skills. You may also feel the need to give them advice about how to solve specific technical problems. But during a crisis and for front-line workers, you’re one of the few places and persons they can turn to for emotional support. So it’s critical that you make their well-being a focus for any mentoring discussion.

Encourage your mentees to share what they’re feeling. Reassure them, offer wellness strategies, and affirm their strengths.

How Are You Really Doing?

Begin with listening. Ask your mentees, “How are you really doing?”—more than once. Expect to hear about grief, anxiety, and fear. Encourage them to talk about these feelings.

Naming emotions helps us feel them, and allows them to flow through us, bringing a helpful shift in brain activity and perspective. Expect too that your mentoring meetings may involve more emotion than usual, including tears.

Practise Highly Supportive Reflective Listening

If you’re worried about what exact words to use with your mentees, know that reflective listening is in itself highly supportive. This just involves taking the essence of what the mentee said and offering it back as a connecting confirmation that they have been heard and understood.

For example, if your mentee is describing how stressful work is, you could say, “I hear it’s really stressful—and it’s hard to know what to do with the unexpected.”  

If you want to dig deeper, you can ask, “What is your biggest challenge right now?  What is helping? What’s going well—or still OK—in your world?”

In times of stress, clarifying what is most important to your mentees can be the biggest gift of all. In so doing you help them appreciate and focus on the things that bring meaning and purpose to their life.

Lower Expectations, Appreciate Strength

Offer reassurance and opportunities for connection. Discuss lowering expectations in these uncertain times. Explain that they shouldn’t feel they have to push themselves beyond their limits.

At the same time, express your appreciation for their strengths.

Simply naming them can be surprisingly helpful: “One of the things I most appreciate is your curiosity and drive for learning.” Or: “Coronavirus is one for the history books. You’re helping to pull us through. Thank you.”

Encourage Increase In Number And Spread of Mentee’s Support Team

Finally, share tactics for supporting their emotional well-being. Encourage your mentees to have their own support team and to limit their media exposure.

Offer a detail or two about your support team, and how you use it; ask about their own loved ones. Even just talking about mental health resources helps to normalize them. Each of us has used a coach, psychologist, therapist, or spiritual counselor. And at various times, has shared this fact with our mentees, as appropriate.

For both mentors and mentees, this may also be an especially meaningful time to renew dormant connections. Even if it’s been years since you’ve been in touch. A “check-in” call or e-mail can help.

And while virtual mentoring may not be as satisfying as the in-person kind, there is evidence supporting its efficacy.  In ways large and small, one person can make a lasting difference.

Even a few words, mentioned in passing, can last a lifetime.

Click to read the original script @ Harvard Business Review – Mentoring During A Crisis by David P. Fessell, Vineet Chopra and Sanjay Saint


Welcome to Worklife Feed articles and site-files indexing and adaptation series.

YALE YOUNG GLOBAL SCHOLARS (YYGS) 2021 PROGRAM

YALE YOUNG GLOBAL SCHOLARS (YYGS)

Yale Young Global Scholars (YYGS) has announced its decision to host all 2021 sessions virtually. Running the program virtually, started with the 2020 edition. It was a natural action for the program as organisations across the world went virtual because of the effect of COVID-19 pandemic. At YYGS, the top priority is protecting the health and safety of students, instructors, and staff in the program’s community.

The 2021 Yale Young African Scholars (YYAS) program will also be online. YYAS was modeled off its sister program, Yale Young Global Scholars, and continues to operate under its umbrella.

Yale Young Global Scholars (YYGS) is an unparalleled academic and leadership program at Yale University. It is an academic enrichment program for outstanding high school students from around the world. Each summer, students from over 130 countries (including all 50 U.S. states) participate in one interdisciplinary, two-week session.

Check Your Eligibility And Then Apply Now

Eligible Countries: YYGS accepts applications from ALL countries, and offers the opportunity for students to apply for need-based financial aid to students from ALL countries.

Eligibility: In order to apply to YYGS, applicants MUST fulfill all of the following requirements:

  • Age: Be at least 16 years old by July 19, 2021 (first day of Session III). This rule is so that YYGS is in compliance with legal restrictions for running a summer program for minors, and no exceptions can be made.
  • English Fluency: Be able to participate in a rigorous academic curriculum conducted in English.
  • Grade Level: Be a current high school sophomore or junior (or international equivalent).
  • Graduation Date: Be graduating in May/June 2022 or 2023 from the Northern Hemisphere, or in Nov./Dec. 2021 or 2022 from the Southern Hemisphere.
  • YYGS Participation: Be a first-time participant in YYGS. If you have participated in any YYGS session during a previous summer (e.g., 2020, 2019), then you are not eligible to participate during YYGS 2021. Please note: If you previously applied to YYGS but were not offered admission or were unable to attend AND you meet the eligibility criteria noted above, then you are encouraged to re-apply for YYGS 2021.

APPLY NOW for the 2021 Yale Young Global Scholars (YYGS) program!

Application Deadline: November 10, 2020 (Early Action) and January 12, 2021 (Regular Decision).

Fees: Program tuition is significantly adjusted to account for the virtual offering. The total cost for a two-week session of YYGS Connect 2021 is $3,500 USD. YYGS still plans to award financial aid (in partial or full tuition discounts) to students with demonstrated need. To be considered for financial aid, students must complete the financial aid section of the YYGS admissions application.

About Yale Young Global Scholars (YYGS) Online Program

The online program, YYGS Connect, will closely mirror and build upon last year’s online model. Summer 2020 was incredibly diverse and included participants from over 130 countries and all 50 U.S. states.

Students were able to deeply engage with one another during live academic program components. This also continued within private official YYGS Facebook groups, and as members of the YYGS social media team. The program is dedicated to continuing to find creative ways to foster global connections in a virtual setting.

Participants will take part in a curriculum that is designed to be as rigorous and intellectually rewarding as the on-campus experience.

This programming includes access to Yale campus resources through Opportunities Across Yale (OAY) virtual events. OYA connect students to libraries, campus departments, faculty, and more.

During YYGS Connect, students will average 20 hours a week (with weekends off) and participate in live Yale faculty lectures, small-scale seminars, simulations and more. All students who successfully complete the program will receive an electronic completion certificate.

Testimonial About Yale Young Global Scholars (YYGS) Connect – Online Program

“Even though our daughter couldn’t have the in-person experience because of the pandemic, she left each online class feeling like she had been pushed to think critically and brainstorm ideas to solve many different global challenges. We got to learn something new every night at dinner as she enthusiastically brought up the discussions she had in class. Additionally, YYGS made sure that the transition to an online platform was as seamless as possible. The program managers were extremely organised and supportive throughout the session. YYGS was definitely the best and most enriching summer experience she’s ever had.” -Nelson S., YYGS Connect (2020), Parent

Similar to last year, students will participate in a morning or afternoon track that best suits their time zone. YYGS Connect has a strict attendance policy, and students must attend all program components to earn their completion certificate. Interested students can view tentative schedules on the YYGS Connect webpage.

“Despite [YYGS] going virtual due to the pandemic, I was able to meet a diverse group of people from all over the world, who had their own unique sets of beliefs. To this day, I am still talking to the people that I have met from the two week program, and I continue to meet more alums through the alumni network.” –Eric L., YYGS Connect (2020), Student

Learn More – Sign Up For Webinar

YYGS staff will host a live webinar next week to discuss the virtual program in more detail. Guest speakers will include a YYGS lecturer, instructor, and alumnus who attended YYGS Connect last year. Sign-up for the webinar here.


Welcome to Worklife Feed articles and site-files indexing and adaptation series.

Success Start-Off In Basements, Garages, Bedrooms

SUCCESS START-OFF IN BASEMENTS, GARAGES, BEDROOMS Framed

Many successful companies were born in people’s dorm rooms, garages, and basements. So what is it about success start-off in basements, garages, and bedrooms? Possibly nothing.

Perhaps it is just normal for new or young entrepreneurs with big ideas and little money to spend, to just start from where they are and what they have. Not just wisdom, but prudence that comes out of constraints, and determination that some expenses (including a proper office space) should be out of the question in the early stages of building a business.

You may like, Billionaire Brothers Raised In Terraced House To Buy ASDA

Amazon Online Book Store – Jeff Bezos (Home Garage)

SUCCESS START-OFF IN BASEMENTS, GARAGES, BEDROOMS

Amazon began as an online book store in Jeff Bezos’ home garage. In 1994, Jeff Bezos decided to take advantage of the internet’s potential. He quit his New York hedge fund job and drove to Bellevue, Washington, where he rented a house.

Bezos spent a year programming the site which initially sold books out of his garage, and in July 1995, success start-off for Jeff and Amazon.com went live.

Today, Bezos is the richest person in the world, with a net worth of about $140 billion . Amazon is valued at about $1.2 trillion .

In a 1998 interview , Bezos said, “I know why people move out of garages. It’s not because they ran out of room. It’s because they ran out of electric power. They have so many computers in the garage that circuit breakers kept flipping … we couldn’t plug in a vacuum cleaner, or a hair dryer anymore in the house.”

“It’s not where you start but where you finish that counts.”

Zig Ziglar

Facebook Idea – Mark Zuckerberg’s (Harvard Freshman Dorm Room)

SUCCESS START-OFF IN BASEMENTS, GARAGES, BEDROOMS

Mark Zuckerberg created a website called Facemash in 2003 while studying at Harvard. The site let students judge other people’s levels of attractiveness, but was quickly taken down after two days.

Keeping the momentum going, a year later, Zuckerberg and his friends Eduardo Saverin, Dustin Moskovitz, and Chris Hughes created The Facebook. Thereafter, success start-off and the social networking site quickly spread to colleges across the country.

In the years since, Facebook has come under attack over privacy concerns. While testifying in front of the Senate Judiciary Committee and Commerce Committee during the Cambridge Analytica scandal in 2018, Zuckerberg often cited his humble roots, explaining , “The history of how we got here is we started off in my dorm room with not a lot of resources.”

Today, Facebook is valued at about $500 billion and has around 45,000 full-time employees .

“It’s not that I’m so smart, it’s just that I stay with problems longer.”

Albert Einstein

Microsoft – Bill Gates and Paul Allen (Albuquerque Garage)

SUCCESS START-OFF IN BASEMENTS, GARAGES, BEDROOMS

In 1975 , the pair started Micro-Soft, for microprocessors and software, to develop an operating software for the Altair 8800, an early personal computer.

Gates and Allen worked in a garage in Albuquerque, but later used the Sundowner Motor Hotel as a basecamp because it was conveniently located across the street from a personal computer company.

Today, Microsoft is valued at about $1.3 trillion and employs around 148,465 people .

On a visit back to Albuquerque, Gates said, “There’s no better symbol for the entrepreneur than the humble garage. Of course … we founded our company in a garage to preserve the pile of money I got from my parents, but I assume other people do it because they’re poor.”

“Things are never quite as scary, when you have a best friend”

Bill Watterson

GoogleLarry Page and Sergey Brin (Susan Wojcicki’s Garage)

SUCCESS START-OFF IN BASEMENTS, GARAGES, BEDROOMS

According to a Business Insider profile of Susan Wojcicki, in 1998, Wojcicki and her husband, Dennis Troper, bought a four-bedroom home in Menlo Park, California, and rented the garage out to two Stanford doctoral students to help pay their mortgage.

The students happened to be Larry Page and Sergey Brin, who were working on their new company, Google. Wojcicki eventually became the 16th employee at Google, which later moved to an office space in 1999.

In 2019, Page and Brin stepped down from the company, writing, “We could not have imagined, back in 1998 when we moved our servers from a dorm room to a garage, the journey that would follow.”

Today, Google is valued at about $870 billion and as of late 2019, Google had around 114,000 employees.

“Great things in business are never done by one person. They’re done by a team of people”

Steve Jobs

AppleSteve Jobs (Parents’ Garage)

Back in 1976, Steve Jobs’ parents’ garage in Silicon Valley played a role in the early stages of Apple. However, Jobs and his co-founder, Steve Wozniak, quickly outgrew the space, Wozniak told Bloomberg Businessweek.

According to a Washington Post article, Wozniak has dubbed the idea that Apple was “founded” in a garage “a bit of a myth,” but he also admitted that the garage is part of the company’s story.

In 2014, he told Businessweek, “The garage represents us better than anything else, but we did no designs there. We would drive the finished products to the garage, make them work and then we’d drive them down to the store that paid us cash.”

The garage, from where success start-off for Jobs, is attached to his childhood home in Los Altos, California, and has since been designated as a historic site .

Today, Apple is worth about $1.2 trillion with retail stores in 25 countries . As of 2019, the company employed about 137,000 people around the world.

“Do what you can, with what you have, where you are.”

Theodore Roosevelt

Walt Disney – Walt Disney (Uncle’s Backyard Garage)

SUCCESS START-OFF IN BASEMENTS, GARAGES, BEDROOMS
180220

In 1922, Walt Disney created “Alice in Cartoonland,” which were seven-minute bits combining animation and live-action. But Disney was cheated by a New York film distributor and eventually had to move to Hollywood to find other work in the movie industry.

In Hollywood, Disney lived with his uncle and set up shop in his garage drawing cartoons. According to Encyclopedia Britannica , after hearing that his “Alice” cartoon was still popular, Disney and his brother Roy purchased a $200 used camera and set up Disney Brothers Cartoon Studio. From there they created the entire “Alice Comedies” series and success start-off for them.

Today, Disney is valued at about $183 billion and employs around 223,000 people .

“There are no secrets to success. It is the result of preparation, hard work and learning from failure”

Colin Powell

Under Armour – Kevin Plank (Grandmother’s Basement)

SUCCESS START-OFF IN BASEMENTS, GARAGES, BEDROOMS

According to a Business Insider profile of Under Armour, In 1996 , Kevin Plank founded the company with the goal of creating athletic wear that was able to wick away sweat and be worn as a base layer for intense activity.

At the time, Plank was living in his grandmother’s townhouse in Georgetown, where he used the basement as his office.

Today, Under Armour is valued at about $4 billion .

In an interview with The Washington Post , Plank said, “I remember the guys from the NFL called me up one day and they said, ‘Kevin, we’re going to be in D.C. today, we want to come by the office and see you,’ which had me looking around Grandma’s house thinking ‘Oh my gosh, don’t do that.'”

“Quitting employment is the best decision I ever made in my adult life. There is a lot of contentment in building your own empire. It is step at a time but with so much satisfaction as you climb the growth staircase.”

Noellah Musundi

SpanxSara Blakely (Her Apartment In Georgia)

SUCCESS START-OFF IN BASEMENTS, GARAGES, BEDROOMS

Sara Blakely was working as a door-to-door fax machine salesperson when she came up with the idea for Spanx. While wearing open-toe shoes, she decided to cut the feet off of a pair of pantyhose and realized she was on to something.

As explained in a story by Forbes , Blakely spent two years carefully researching and preparing for the launch of Spanx while also working a full-time job. She then went to a pitch meeting and convinced Neiman Marcus to give her product a chance. Using Neiman Marcus as leverage, Blakely was then able to also convince Bloomingdale’s, Saks and Bergdorf Goodman to give Spanx a shot.

But even then, she had no corporate space. She’d package and ship the Spanx orders from home with the help of her boyfriend , and took phone calls from her bathtub or bed, according to the Forbes article.

Laurie Ann Goldman came to help Blakely, becoming the fifth employee and eventual CEO. In an interview with Forbes , she recalled her first office being the kitchen in Blakely’s Georgia apartment.

According to Forbes, as of June 2019, Blakely had a net worth of $1 billion.

“Start where you are. Use what you have. Do what you can.”

Arthur Ashe

Tumblr – David Karp (Childhood Bedroom)

SUCCESS START-OFF IN BASEMENTS, GARAGES, BEDROOMS

In 2007, David Karp founded Tumblr, the micro-blogging and social-networking site. At the time, Karp was working from his bedroom in his mother’s small apartment in New York. According to The Guardian , on the night the site went live, it gained 75,000 users.

In an interview with The San Diego Union-Tribune about Karp’s love for computers, Karp’s mom said, “David would come running through the apartment saying, ‘Mom! Mom! There’s this and this and this!’ And I didn’t know what the heck he was talking about. Because it was a whole other language.”

The Washington Post reported that in 2013, Tumblr sold to Yahoo for $1.1 billion. But in 2019, WordPress bought the blogging site for a rumored mere $3 million.

“If you don’t build your dreams, someone will hire you to help build theirs”

Tony Gaskin

Dell – Michael Dell (University of Texas Dorm Room/Garage)

In 1984, most computers were mailed in separate parts, with consumers expected to assemble them themselves. Michael Dell wanted to sell custom-built computers designed for individual company’s specific needs.

The original company name was PC’s Limited , which he started in his college dorm room at UT Austin. Needing more space, Dell moved to his nearby garage, eventually dropping out of college to pursue Dell full time and his success start-off after.

Today, Dell is valued at about $30 billion and employs around 165,000 people .

“You don’t have to be great to start, but you have to start to be great”

Zig Ziglar

Harley Davidson Motorcycle – William Harley (Wooden Shed)

In 1901 , William S. Harley drew a blueprint for an engine that could fit inside a bicycle. In 1903 , William and his brother Arthur built the first Harley Davidson motorcycle in a 10-by-15-foot wooden shed.

The shed’s door had “Harley Davidson Motor Company” written on it.

Today, Harley Davidson is valued at about $2.8 billion. In 2019, there were an estimated 1,569 dealerships around the world.

“It is hard to fail, but it is worse never to have tried to succeed”

Theodore Roosevelt

Yankee Candle – Mike Kittredge (Family’s Kitchen)

In 1969, the then 16-year-old Mike Kittredge melted crayons and canning wax to make his mother a candle for Christmas in a milk carton.

A neighbor was also interested, eventually inspiring Kittredge to design and craft the candles in his family’s kitchen, where the company known now as Yankee Candle was eventually born. That was from where his success start-off.

Today, Yankee Candle has over 475 company-owned retail stores nationwide.

“Never worry about numbers. Help one person at a time, and always start with the person nearest you”

Mother Teresa

Hewlett Packard – Bill Hewlett and David Packard (One-car Garage)

After bonding on a camping trip, Bill Hewlett and David Packard began renting a garage in Palo Alto and working there part-time. In 1938, the duo created Hewlett-Packard’s first product , the resistance-capacitance audio oscillator, which was used to test sound equipment.

When naming the company, the duo flipped a coin to decide whose name should go first. Today, the company is valued at about $21 billion and as of 2019, HP had employed around 56,000 people .

“Be the change you wish to see in the world.”

Mahatma Gandhi

Mattel – Harold “Matt” Matson and Elliot Handler (Garage)

In 1944 , Matt Matson, a skilled craftsman, was working out of his garage in Southern California when Elliot Handler asked if he could build some of his picture frame ideas. Handler’s wife Ruth then took the samples and sold them for $3,000 at a local photography studio.

In October of 1944, after the frames were a huge success, Matson and Handler decided to combine their last names, and Mattel was born.

While building frames in the garage, Handler also made dollhouse furniture out of the leftover wood from the picture frames. The furniture became a huge success and the company eventually pivoted towards making toys. The pivot paid off, their success start-off and as today Mattel is valued at about $3 billion.

“Risk more than others think is safe. Dream more than others think is practical”

Howard Schultz

Empires From Sand Castles Or Side Hustles – Get The Passion Out

Many of the most recognizable companies started as small side hustles. Some founders were working full-time jobs while building their side hustle.

For example, Steve Jobs was working at Atari, while building the Apple I. In 1976, Steve Jobs was working the night shift at Atari, and Steve Wozniak was an engineer at HP. In their spare time, they worked on building a computer in a garage, which became known as Apple I. They made the machine using Atari parts and presented it to Jobs’ boss, who eventually declined to invest. 

Major social media companies like Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram, started as side projects. Retail companies like Yankee Candle and Under Armour also began as passion projects. 

Where is your garage? What do you have in your hand? When are you starting? Today is the tomorrow you should not regret. Success start-off now.

Myfwl/Work Life Feed has adapted the write up for our readers. Click here to view the original write up at www.africa.businessinsider.com

Billionaire Brothers Raised In terraced House To Buy ASDA

BILLIONAIRE BROTHERS RAISED IN TERRACED HOUSE TO BUY ASDA..

Two billionaire brothers raised in a terraced house in Blackburn are on the brink of buying supermarket giant Asda. Mohsin Issa, 49, and sibling Zuber, 48 could rubber stamp the mega money buy-out soon with a deal to take over the supermarket giant Asda.

Mohsin and Zuber Issa, self-made tycoons are part of an expected £6.5billion takeover of Britain’s third biggest grocer.

It would cap a remarkable rise for the brothers whose mother and father came to Britain from India in the 1960s with little to their name.

Billionaire Brothers Started Out In A Garage

Mohsin, 49, and Zuber, 48, the billionaire brothers started out in a garage which their dad, who had worked in a woollen mill, bought.

They branched out on their own, first renting a petrol station for two years. Then in 2001 buying their first forecourt, a derelict freehold site in Bury, and formed Euro Garages.

The brothers could be Asda’s new owners this week (Image: LightRocket via Getty Images)

Their empire, the EG Group, now has almost 6,000 sites across 10 countries, from the UK to the US and Australia. They run outlets for Greggs, Starbucks and KFC, and employs 44,000 people.

In 2017, it bought 77 Little Chef roadside restaurants.

Zuber said: “We grew (EG) from nothing.”

“We’ve been on the pumps, we’ve been stocking the shelves, cleaning the toilets. You do everything.”

“And once you do the foundation work, it’s no different wherever you go in the world. It’s a petrol station; you’re selling fuel, you’re selling coffee, you’re selling convenience.”

Mohsin said the company “makes more money selling a cup of coffee than we would do on an average tank fill-up”.

Mohsin, who is married and with two grown-up children, runs the business day-to-day. While Zuber is responsible for strategy and acquisitions.

A Strong Giving Connection To A Starting Root

Sources describe the low-profile brothers as humble, with a strong connection to their Blackburn roots.

They have just opened a £35million HQ in the town and in 2012 set-up local football team Euro Garages FC.

The brothers also set-up the ISSA Foundation which funds projects promoting health, educating and tackling poverty in the UK and abroad. The foundation also bought an MRI scanner for Blackburn Royal Hospital.

Starting Off On A Billionaire Wealth Journey From Blackburn’s Terraced Streets

In 2017 they bought a Grade II listed Georgian townhouse in London’s Kensington for £25million, which is now being converted into a luxury home.

Meanwhile, it is just a 10 minute drive from Blackburn’s terraced streets to wide open spaces of the town’s millionaire’s row overlooking the rolling Lancashire hills.

The modest house they grew up in, in Blackburn, Lancashire (Image: Julian Hamilton/Daily Mirror)

It is here that the siblings are building five giant homes for themselves and their relatives.

As their petrol station business started to expand after the turn of the millennium, Zuber and Mohsin wanted to stay in the same area and moved with their families to a newly built large detached home.

Their parents still live in the area, close to the local mosque. But now it seems they will be joining their sons in a row of five incredible mansions, complete with basement swimming pools, on the edge of the town.

In a barber shop on a sloping street where they used to live in an end terraced house, the family are fondly remembered.

“They are good people, a very nice family” said one man. Zuber used to come in here to have his hair cut. They are good people who worked hard.”

A man strolling along the Issas old terraced street said: “They have done very well for themselves but they have stayed in Blackburn. “People have been talking about them buying Asda and are pleased for them. “They are well like people and have done well. Good luck to them.”

Billionaire Brothers Funding Model Of ASDA Deal

However, the money for the Asda takeover is coming from their personal fortunes. Private equity firm TDR, which owns half of the EG Group, is expected to put in a big chunk.

And it is believed Asda’s parent company, US giant Walmart, will retain a stake. Although the rumoured sale price is £5billion less than it paid for the chain in 1999.

Myfwl/Work Life Feed has adapted the write up for our readers. Click here to view the original write up at www.mirror.co.uk

Ruth Bader Ginsburg Best Career Advice In One Sentence

Ruth Bader Ginsburg Delivered The Best Career Advice You'll Ever Hear, In Just One Sentence

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Getty Images for Berggruen Institute

With the passing of the iconic Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, many Americans have poured encomiums on her. Some wants her memory to be a blessing, others have formed an RBG hashtag revolution. The hashtag followers are promising to fight every day, as did #RBG to achieve #EqualityForAll.

RBG (Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg) was until recently, the United States Supreme Court Justice. She is acclaimed to have lived an amazing life, impacting the lives of others before she died at 87, September 2020. She was appointed in 1993 by President Bill Clinton.

People were drawn to her for different reasons. For some, it is how she consistently delivered progressive votes on the most divisive social issues of the day. Issues such as abortion rights, same-sex marriage, voting rights, immigration, health care and affirmative action. Will a career advise from her take you from good to great?

Insight and nuggets of career advice from her can actually apply to everyone, regardless of career stage.

Ruth Bader Ginsburg And A Good Career Advice

Four years ago, Ruth Bader Ginsburg wrote an article in the New York Times in which she offered her advice for living.

In the article, she says: “Another often-asked question when I speak in public: “Do you have some good advice you might share with us?” Yes, I do. It comes from my savvy mother-in-law, advice she gave me on my wedding day.

“In every good marriage,” she counseled, “it helps sometimes to be a little deaf. I have followed that advice assiduously, and not only at home through 56 years of a marital partnership nonpareil. I have employed it as well in every workplace, including the Supreme Court. When a thoughtless or unkind word is spoken, best tune out. Reacting in anger or annoyance will not advance one’s ability to persuade.”

“It helps to be a little deaf”

Her line, “it helps to be a little deaf,” might just be the best piece of career advice ever given. And, like so many of her insights, her intuition is firmly supported by research. Being deaf to thoughtless and unkind words is essential to having a successful and fulfilling career.

Resilience, Response To Criticism And Letting Go

For example, tens of thousands have taken the online test “How Do You React To Constructive Criticism?” And we’ve learned that, when receiving tough feedback, fewer than a quarter of people are really able to let go of their anger and start moving forward.

But those who can respond effectively to tough feedback (i.e., tuning out the unkind words) are 42% more likely to love their job.

Research has also shown that people who do well at forgiving others (i.e. letting go of their anger and resentment) typically experience fewer negative physical health symptoms, like disorders of the cardiovascular or immune system.

Being able to tune out the thoughtless words you’re guaranteed to hear, isn’t just important to keep yourself psychologically healthy, it’s also a necessary ingredient for resilience. That is, one’s ability to bounce back quickly from failure, adversity, stress, etc.

“If you can keep yourself from perseverating on unkind words hurled in your direction, you’re far more likely to pick yourself up, dust yourself off, and go right back to what you were doing.”

Resilient Like A Ruth Bader Ginsburg?

And we need resilience right now. Data from the online Resiliency Test has discovered that fewer than a quarter of people have high resilience right now (you may want to test your own resilience).

In the study Employee Engagement Is Less Dependent On Managers Than You Think, 11,308 employees were surveyed about their engagement at work. And the study revealed that employees’ self-engagement (i.e. their personal outlooks like resilience, optimism, proactivity, etc.) can actually matter more than working for a great manager.

One of the discoveries from the study is that employees with high resilience are 310% more likely to love their jobs than employees with low resilience. And 136% more than employees with even moderate resilience.

Whether you want greater success or more happiness, whether you work from home or in an office, everything begins with Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s timeless and elegantly simple words, “it helps sometimes to be a little deaf.”

How The Pursuit Of Audacious Goals Can Marry Thoughtless Or Unkind Words

Anyone who pursues big or audacious goals (like being the second woman to serve on the U.S. Supreme Court) is going to hear some thoughtless or unkind words. To help yourself, tune out those words, and implement Ginsburg’s advice, here’s a little trick.

“Reacting in anger or annoyance will not advance one’s ability to persuade.”

You may also like, Tips For Building Better Relationships

Whenever someone hurls some unkind words your way, ask yourself, “What are the facts here?” Set aside the other person’s emotions (e.g., their anger, resentment, accusations, jealousy, etc.). Then, listen only for whether there are any facts.

Living A Remarkable Life, The Ruth Bader Ginsburg Way

Imagine someone says to me, “you’re an idiot for thinking that project would work, you didn’t even calculate an ROI. Only a moron would do something that stupid.”

There are plenty of unkind words in that diatribe. But there’s also a fact, namely, that I didn’t calculate an ROI. So I will take that fact (which is quite useful) and focus on it to the exclusion of the unkind words. By staying factual, we stay calmer. We’re then better to discern the one or two nuggets that are often contained within even the most thoughtless and unkind comments.

Ruth Bader Ginsburg led a remarkable life. And while we might not equal her legendary career heights, we can all apply her advice. We can be a little deaf to thoughtless and unkind words. As she notes, “Reacting in anger or annoyance will not advance one’s ability to persuade.”

Myfwl/Work Life Feed has adapted the write up for our readers. Click here to view the original write up at www.forbes.com

Office Housework VP Job Can Bury Leadership Strength

We Need To Talk About “Office Housework”

We need to talk about “office housework,” because women and minorities are doing more of it . What’s office housework? Some is actual workplace housekeeping, like tidying up the break room or rearranging chairs around a conference table.

“Talk to a mentor a mentor about how she or he deflects the minutiae of everyday work life in order to lock focus on the bigger picture.”

The term also encompasses communal tasks like having lunch catered, setting up a team offsite, or giving a new colleague a tour of the photocopier and restrooms.

By definition, office housework is unseen and unrewarded. No one sealed a promotion to senior director on the strength of being awesome at corralling conference-call RSVPs or the “just-in-time” replacement of coffee filters.

“Working less on low-prestige busywork can free you up to focus on delivering results and making a bigger difference.”

I’m not saying you should never contribute to office housework. Instead, take a stand for sharing the load equitably.

Related: Super Spoiler Toxic Work Trait People Think Is Healthy

Don’t let your leadership strengths get buried under a mountain of low-level, inconsequential tasks. Don’t let the burden land disproportionately on others, either.

Myfwl/Work Life Feed re-adapted the write up for short minutes readers. Click here to view the full original write up at www.forbes.com. Note, it was adapted from Woman of Influence: 9 Steps to Build Your Brand, Establish Your Legacy, and Thrive (McGraw-Hill) by Jo Miller.

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A woman’s work life and career break, no doom spell

A woman's work life

Teresa Mosqueda, a Seattle City Council member attends a meeting from home during the coronavirus in Seattle, Washington, US, March 23. Reuters/ A woman’s work life

The economic fallout of Covid-19 has already pushed tens of millions of people across the world into unemployment, the majority of them women.

“I think once a woman makes a decision to come back, she is going to be a bigger star than she was and these women were already stars before.”

The severity of the crisis, coupled with the fact that the burden of caring for the sick, the elderly and young children in our society falls disproportionately on women, suggests difficult times ahead for women’s careers.

The progress women have made in the labour force over the last 30 years could be reversed in a period of one year or less.

———————–

A woman’s work life and career break – feedback from great back to work programmes

In interviews, the returners described the 10-week experience as “a lab”, “being part of a family” and “a safe space”. The programme manager adopted a protective stance toward her charges as they took their first steps back into the corporate world, describing herself as a “godmother duck” and the returners as “swans that became so beautiful”.

The returners were not the only ones changed by R2C. The recruiting manager responsible for selecting R2C participants said: “I will be honest, as a woman who has not been a mother, when I see big career gaps, I assume this career gap is by choice…I am not sure about the commitment.”

However, looking back over the R2C experience, the recruiting manager said, “What I realised is a lot of these women did not mean to leave for four years…Sometimes you cannot go back. Sometimes, you have relocated with your husband. A person has the right to take some time off.”

Related: Worklife Grooves on Ferrari with a Mentor

Click here to view the full original write up at www.thenational.ae

Zoe Kinias is an associate professor of organisational behaviour at Insead and the academic director of its gender initiative

Henriane Mourgue d’Algue is an executive coach and a graduate of Insead’s Executive Master in Change programme

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Fired From Your HR Job, It Doesn’t Exist In 2022 Future

Fired From Your HR Job

This is year 2022 and Coronavirus has drastically reshaped the economy and the labor force. I am therefore directed to inform you, that you are fired from your HR job. It doesn’t exist in this 2022 future.

Since Coronavirus rapid spread around the globe, we have experienced titanic shifts in how we work, where we work, and the technologies we use to stay connected.

We believe this is HR’s moment to lead organizations in navigating the future.

Such massive change is escalating the importance of HR’s role within organizations. Workers are turning to their managers and their HR leaders, in particular, for guidance on how to navigate their “new normal”.

Research indicates that 73% of workers depend on their employer for support in preparing for the future of work.

Your Chance To Survive The Future, Before You’re Fired From Your HR Job

Just as CFOs have greatly increased their scope since the 2008 financial crisis, CHRO’s now have that same opportunity to become central C-suite players.

We believe this is HR’s moment to lead organizations in navigating the future. They have a tremendous opportunity, and responsibility, to provide workers with guidance. With change, people need help on the skills and capabilities they will need to be successful over the next decade as new roles continue to emerge.

Work-life, The Future of Work and Future Workplace

With that in mind, The Cognizant Center for Future of Work and Future Workplace jointly embarked on a nine-month initiative. This is to determine exactly what the future of HR will look like.

The Center brought together the Future Workplace network of nearly 100 CHROs, CLOs, and VP’s of talent and workforce transformation. Their job was to envision how HR’s role might evolve over the next 10 years.

“The 2020s will be a reset moment for HR.”

Their brainstorm considered economic, political, demographic, societal, cultural, business, and technology trends.

You may also like; Future of HR – People Profession 2030 Hackathon

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New Future Deal For HR – Starting From Over 60 New Future HR Jobs

The result was the conception of over 60 new HR jobs. It included detailed responsibilities and skills needed to succeed in each role. Each job was then ranked by its organizational impact. This narrowed the list to an initial 21 HR jobs of the future.

The Process: HR jobs were arranged on a 2×2 grid; the X-axis depicts time – over the next 10 years. Y-axis depicts “technology centricity”; that is, all jobs will utilize innovative technologies, but only the most tech-centric will actually require a grounding in computer science.

“Before it can be built, it has to be dreamed.”

The advent of Covid-19 compressed time like an accordion. A handful of these roles became “jobs of the now.” The 2020s will be a reset moment for HR. The Center in their report, fully expect to see more examples of these theoretical “jobs-made-real,” by visionary leaders in the coming months and years.

Five Core Themes Of The Top 21 HR Jobs of The Future

While some of the roles identified are entirely new positions, others are new responsibilities. They are becoming increasingly important as HR re-imagines and reboots its strategy in light of the pandemic. All 21 jobs embody five core themes that the Center came across in their research.

They are individual and organizational resilience, organizational trust and safety, creativity and innovation, data literacy and human-machine partnerships.

The Human-Human Relation Themes

Individual and organizational resilience. The future of work will include developing a stronger focus and a more holistic view of employee wellbeing. One that encompasses the emotional, mental and spiritual health of workers along with the physical.

Even before the virus, Gallup reported two thirds of full-time workers experienced burnout on the job.

Organizational trust and safety. HR professionals are in a unique position to be guardians and models of an ethical and responsible workplace. As organizations invest in digital transformation initiatives and establish a “data culture,” the Center believe the expectations to uphold this responsibility will increase.

LinkedIn research found that 67% of hiring managers and recruiters said AI saves them time as they source job candidates. But questions are now being raised around this technology and its potential for bias, inaccuracy, and lack of transparency.

Creativity and innovation. As business leaders envision new ways to grow their organizations in the midst of rapid change, a new role at the intersection of corporate strategy and HR must arise. 

The Future of Work Leader, would be responsible for analyzing what skills will be most essential as the workforce continues to evolve.

The Human-Machine Relations Themes

Data literacy. Currently, only a few HR functions are building analytics capabilities into their teams to solve key people challenges. This could be uncovering why one team performs better than another. Or how their organization can create a more diverse and inclusive culture.

In the future, HR teams will be a more data-driven function. Doing so would allow them to provide more accurate insights for engagement of C-suite leaders.

Human-machine partnerships. As the use of robots in companies continues to increase, it has become apparent that there is a need for human-machine collaboration in the workforce. Judgment is usually easy for humans, but still hard for computers.

Sorting out the balance of the “art of the job” (for humans) vs. the “science of the job” (for bots) will likely result in the creation of new HR roles. Such will be focused on how both can work together intuitively.

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The 21 HR Jobs of The Future To Prepare For; Before You Are Fired From Your HR Job

Change is coming, and it’s best to get a head start. Companies and individuals that can anticipate their organization’s future HR roles will likely be in a position to outperform competitors. They are also squarely positioning HR and themselves as a strategic business driver.

This is year 2020, and you have been fired from your HR job. Cheer up, you are prepared ahead. Make a choice of your preference from the options below.

  • Director of Wellbeing
  • Director of Wellbeing
  • Work from Home Facilitator
  • Human Bias Officer
  • Strategic HR Business Continuity Director
  • The Future of Work Leader
  • VR Immersion Counselor
  • HR Data Detective
  • Human-Machine Teaming Manager
  • ChatBot Coach
  • Human-Machine Teaming Manager
  • HR Data Detective
  • Head of Business Behavior
  • Global Head of Employee Experience
  • Financial Wellness Manager

Visit the original write up for the full list of 21 jobs.

The Closing Before You’re Fired From Your HR Job Into Other Future HR Jobs

As new and existing roles evolve, the most successful organizations and individuals will have a clear understanding of what needs to change; what must change to meet future business priorities (both anticipated and unanticipated).

This is worth repeating, a handful of these roles have become “jobs of the now.”

You never know — one day soon, you might be recruiting someone to fill any of these 21 jobs. You may also be doing one yourself, if you escape being fired from your HR job.

……………

Myfwl/Work-Place Feed adapted the write up by Jeanne C. Meister and Robert H. Brown for short minutes readers. Click here to view the full original write up at www.hbr.org. We want to hear from you. Write to us in the Comments section.

Jeanne C. Meister is Managing Partner of Future Workplace. This is an HR Advisory and Membership firm. Co-author of The 2020 Workplace, and founder of the Future Workplace Academy.

Robert H. Brown is Vice President of Center for the Future of Work at Cognizant Technology Solutions. He was previously a Managing Vice President of Research at Gartner, Inc., where he specialized in HR services.

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