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Work-life Quotes – My Mistakes My Experiences

3 Mins read

Work-life Quotes – My Mistakes My Experiences

Have you ever made mistakes in your life? How do you feel about that?

Maybe these books will make you see another perspective:

Charlotte Foltz Jones & John O’Brien – Mistakes That Worked: 40 Familiar Inventions & How They Came to Be

Rona Halsall – One Mistake: A totally unputdownable gripping psychological thriller Skip Prichard […]

Mistakes Quote By Jenna Alatari: “There’s no such…”

This morning, I stopped by the blog of Elena and got inspired by this quote on her short quote blog.

Saying there is no such thing as a mistake, is like saying, we “fail forward”; and all things are learning opportunities. If we choose to, such learning or “failing forward” opportunities help us to realize how to do the particular activity better, next time.

When a recruiter ask for work experience, and you list all the good, great, and big achievements, you will realize that they will come back to you. The only intent is try to clarify a point, “is there such a thing as a bad mistake with you?” That is when they ask you, “if there is anything you can change from the past, what will it be?” They are asking for your “good” and “bad” experiences and how you overcame or learnt from them.

Keep doing your thing, keep taking baby steps, keep learning, and have an open heart. Don’t let the fear of failure put a limitation on what you can do. Go out there, aim for the best, achieve your goals and be who you are meant to be.


Work with “idiots”, even if you realize that one of them is you. You are on a journey of self-discovery and self-improvement. And as you learn to have patience with this newly discovered “idiot”, please try to have patience with other “idiots” you will meet along your path in life.



Welcome to Work-Life Feed Work-life Quotes – My Mistakes My Experiences/ Jenna Alatari


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Why We Need To Practice Self-Compassion

In the frantic pace of life, it can be difficult to keep up. Sometimes when we make mistakes or we feel we don’t work hard enough, we leave ourselves in the dust by thinking things like, “you’re not good enough.” If we’re not careful, a few harsh words here and there can evolve into excessive self-criticism.

The five-minute video animation from the London School of Life suggests another way to approach those negative storylines we jog through our minds. It also offers an easy self-compassion practice for moments when we’re feeling critical of ourselves.


Your may also like, BBC Worklife 09-15-Jan-2021: Why Self-Compassion – Not Self-Esteem – Leads To Success


Why self-compassion – not self-esteem – leads to success.

Extract: A wealth of research shows that self-criticism often backfires – badly. Besides increasing our unhappiness and stress levels, it can increase procrastination and makes us even less able to achieve our goals in the future.

Instead of chastising ourselves, we should practice self-compassion. That is, we should give greater forgiveness for our mistakes, and make a deliberate effort to take care of ourselves throughout times of disappointment or embarrassment. 

“Self-esteem is contingent on success and people liking you, so it is not very stable. You could have it on a good day but lose it on a bad day.”

Kristin Neff
Image credit: Alamy

Measure how much you are cultivating self-compassion. On a scale of 1 (almost never) to 5 (almost always), rate yourself on the statements below:

  • I try to be loving toward myself when I’m feeling emotional pain
  • I try to see my failings as part of the human condition
  • When something painful happens, I try to take a balanced view of the situation

and

  • I’m disapproving and judgmental about my own flaws and inadequacies
  • When I think about my inadequacies, it tends to make me feel more separate and cut off from the rest of the world
  • When I’m feeling down, I tend to obsess and fixate on everything that’s wrong

The more you agree with the first set of statements, and the less you agree with the second set of statements, the higher your self-compassion.

For many of us, the struggles of isolation, remote working and caring for the people we love have provided the perfect breeding ground for self-criticism and doubt. While we cannot eliminate those stresses, we can at least change the ways we view ourselves, giving us the resilience to face the challenges head on.

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