NEW!Incredible offer for our exclusive subscribers! Watch Out

NewsTrendsWork-Life Daily

Microsoft Forecasts The Next Great Disruption As Hybrid Work

5 Mins read

Microsoft forecasts the next great disruption to be hybrid work. Microsoft Corp (NASDAQ: MSFT) (“Microsoft”) titled the report, “The Next Great Disruption is Hybrid Work – Are We Ready?”

The report uncovers seven hybrid work trends every business leader needs to know as we enter this new era of work. It also indicates that business leaders should resist the urge to see hybrid work as business as usual. […]

Welcome to Worklifefeed. Go to https://www.microsoft.com to view the full article on Microsoft Forecasts The Next Great Disruption As Hybrid-Work



NOTES: Microsoft Forecasts The Next Great Disruption As Hybrid Work

The is a follow up to last year move to remote work. The “disruptive” hybrid work model is seen as a blended model, where some employees return to the workplace and others continue to work from home.

To help organizations through the transition, the 2021 Work Trend Index outlines findings from a study of more than 30,000 people in 31 countries. They also state that they analyzed trillions of aggregate productivity and labor signals across Microsoft 365 and LinkedIn. And got perspectives from experts who have studied collaboration, social capital, and space design at work for decades.

Seven Global Hybrid Work Trends Every Business Leader Needs To Know

One thing is abundantly clear: Microsoft is urging businesses to recognize that work is no longer bound to traditional notions of time and space when it comes to how, when, and where we work.

  1. Flexible work is here to stay: 73 percent of workers surveyed want flexible remote work options to continue. While at the same time, 67 percent are craving more in-person time with their teams.
  2. Leaders are out of touch with employees and need a wake-up call: Research shows that 61 percent of leaders say they are thriving right now – 23 percentage points higher than those without decision making power.
  3. High productivity is masking an exhausted workforce: Fifty-four percent feel overworked. Thirty-nine percent feel exhausted. Australia and China were the only two countries where weekly meeting time didn’t triple YOY.
  4. Gen Z is at risk and will need to be re-energized: Sixty percent of this generation — those between the ages of 18 and 25 — say they are merely surviving or flat-out struggling.
  5. Shrinking networks are endangering innovation: Aggregate trends across billions of Microsoft Teams meetings and Outlook emails show interactions with Microsoft broader networks diminished with the move to remote work
  6. Authenticity will spur productivity and well-being: Coworkers leaned on each other in new ways to get through the last year. 1 in 6 (17 percent) has cried with a colleague, especially those in healthcare (23%), travel and tourism (21 percent), and education (20 percent).
  7. Talent is everywhere in a hybrid work world: Nearly half (46 percent) of those surveyed are planning to move to a new location this year. This is indicating that people no longer have to leave their desk, house or community to expand their career opportunities.
Five Strategies Business Leaders Need To Consider For the Shift In The Coming Future Of Work

In addition to uncovering what’s at stake with the future of work, the Work Trend Index identifies five strategies for business leaders as they begin to make the necessary shift:


RECOMMENDED


  • Create a plan to empower people for extreme flexibility
  • Invest in space and technology to bridge the physical and digital worlds
  • Combat digital exhaustion from the top
  • Prioritize rebuilding social capital and culture
  • Rethink employee experience to compete for the best and most diverse talent

To view the full findings, visit Microsoft’s Worklab, a digital publication about the future of work. WorkLab is a Microsoft digital publication devoted to illuminating the future of work, grounded in research and the lessons of the COVID-19 pandemic.


Related

Our Uneasy Love Intimacy With Work In a Pandemic

Our government could have paid people to stop working and stay home, where they could not catch the virus. They did not. Instead, they told service workers they were essential and sent some of them out to risk their lives working.

“This is the life that could not stop working. Even when everything else stopped working, and despite everything else going crazy, we prioritized work. Our love, our life; the love of our life.”

We were forced to choose between our health and our jobs. Most of us chose our jobs. And when companies shut down and jobs vanished, the unemployed among us had to pry vanishingly tiny benefits or go out and find new jobs.

Those of us who were lucky enough to have jobs that could be done from home, brought our work into our living rooms, our kitchens, and our bedrooms. We challenged ourselves to meet and even exceed our pre-pandemic goals, against unfavorable odds. Despite everything, we prioritized work.

We have treated work as something to be taken home and cherished. Work became our lover. And this year, we took it to bed.

In year 2011, Melissa Gregg published a three-year ethnographic study of the professional lives of a group of knowledge workers in Brisbane, Australia. It was titled, Work’s Intimacy. Gregg’s study found that as mobile technologies like laptops and smartphones and wifi proliferated, and as jobs became more precarious and subject to mass layoffs, office workers had begun to experience their entire lives as work-centric.

An Identify and Culture Crisis That Fuels An Uneasy Love Intimacy With Work

There is an identify that our job gives us. For example, the joy of been seen as a competent and dedicated professional. Then our culture makes us disposed to spend our leisure hours thinking of work, and feeling obligated to it. Technology adds to it by providing an added incentive to just go ahead and do that work, no matter where we are or what time it is.

Recommended:

If work is assessed as infidelity, it will score high. The time spent engaged in work-related tasks regularly rivaled or came at the expense of other experiences. We obsess over our jobs because we know we can’t count on them. So we keep thinking about them after we leave the office. And in the end, we find ourselves unable to get them out of our minds, like a bad boyfriend.

Withholding attention from our work and from our screens may make us feel guilty, as though we are somehow cheating. But that shouldn’t be surprising. We’ve been taught to treat work as a loved one. So turning our attention away from it, to other and more valued objects, would be a kind of adultery.

Work is not just in our homes all the time now. Work has very literally gone to bed with us. And work wants to have a serious talk about where this relationship is going. But we do not have to be trapped in an endless, stifling love affair with our own labor. We can build our lives around other things. Things that matter more to us – our loved ones, our communities, and the world in which we live.


The 5 Types of Work-From-Home Personas

A report by Steelcase titledChanging Expectations and the Future of Work pinpointed five patterns of work-from-home experiences (though extreme categorization) based on people’s behaviours and attitudes. It’s important to note that it’s possible for people to associate themselves with more than one of the patterns.

First is the Overworked Caretaker who miss the office for the opportunity it provides to leave home responsibilities behind. Then you have the escapist from hostile work environment, the Relieved Self-Preservationist, who sees the home office as the only safe place. Frustrated Creative Networkers are the individuals who are conflicted about returning to the office. For them, the home office is a suspension from normal life and work.

No matter how others feel, Autonomy Seekers finally got their freedom through the home office. They are thrilled to work at their own rhythm, without someone constantly looking over their shoulder. Enjoying a level of control in designing their own work experience and feeling a greater sense of wellbeing at home. They are sharply contrasted by those to whom, home office is a lonely cage, the Isolated Zoomer. This is a group that values the office because it offers a way to separate work and life.

Let's do more together on Worklifefeed

Get the best hand-picked work-life essentials right in your box.

Thank you for visiting, leave a comment, start a conversation.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: