Bring-Your-Child-To-Work-Day Is Every Day In A Pandemic

Work-Life Daily_ Bring-Your-Child-To-Work-Day

Click to read: Bring-Your-Child-To-Work-Day Is Every Day In A Pandemic

Source: Daily Herald

Snippet: Years before “Take Our Daughters and Sons to Work Day” became a thing, my dad occasionally brought me to his office as the need arose. There was something a bit thrilling about gaining entry into this adult world of cubicles, dry-erase boards and name badges.

It was a novelty to see Dad in this grown-up space. But today, when so many parents are working from home alongside kids who are schooling from home, every day is bring-your-child-to-work-day. And “novelty” no longer describes it.

“Work-from-home and school-from-home means that people are bringing their kids to work but leaving them to play in the parking lot.”

Children aren’t getting an especially exciting view of what their moms and dads do for work. Parents who are capable of working remotely tend to be knowledge workers. And their work mostly happens inside the brain. There’s not a lot to see. Nor are kids getting to see the fun parts of work, like business travel or professional conferences.

Leaving Them To Play In The Parking Lot

Many parents trying to work from home may be interacting less with their children, not more. “In counties where people are staying home the most, we’re seeing more neglect,” says Kerri Raissian, an associate professor of public policy at the University of Connecticut, citing preliminary data from Indiana and Georgia. That’s a first.

Before the pandemic, increased time at home wasn’t associated with child maltreatment. But now, calls to poison control are up. So also are acute pediatric injuries, such as bicycle accidents. This is presumably because kids are getting into trouble while their parents are trying to work. Basically, Raissian says, work-from-home and school-from-home means that “people are bringing their kids to work but leaving them to play in the parking lot.”

“It’s important to remember as parents that we’re modeling how you get the things you want, how you self-advocate and set boundaries,” says Marisa Porges. When a parent explains to her boss that she can’t have a call at 7 p.m. because it’s dinner time, not only does she show her children that they come first, but she also shows them it’s OK for work to come second.

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