Working Moms Battles And The Mental Health Toll

Work-Life Daily_ Working Moms Battles And The Mental Health Toll

Click to read: Working Moms Battles And The Mental Health Toll

Source: Washington Post

Snippet: When they met as students in Chicago, 20 years ago, Vondetta Taylor and Jennifer Anderson were all aspiration. Taylor was training to be a chef. Anderson was working toward a career in broadcasting. They also dreamed of starting families.

As the years passed, the two women traced over those youthful visions with the brushstrokes of real life. Anderson, now 41, got married, moved to Indiana, had a son and started a career in information-technology. Taylor, 38, gave birth to a son she was raising alone while selling insurance full-time.

“Moms are the ones who’ve been left holding the threads. And eventually they just can’t hold on any longer.”

Jessica McCrory Calarco

Taylor was supposed to make 100 sales calls a day while managing her kindergartner’s online education.

Anderson’s husband couldn’t do his custodial work from home, so it was on her to stay home with their 10-year-old son. His school announced it was going to be remote in the fall; Anderson’s employer said she had to come back to the office in late August.

“Working moms: a teacher, a disciplinarian, a mental health counselor, an extracurricular-activities director and working professional. And there was still only one of her.”

Just like that, these two friends became part of a legion of other women leaving the U.S. labor force. In September alone more than 860,000 women dropped out of the workforce, compared to just over 200,000 men. An analysis by the National Women’s Law Center found that women left the labor force at four times the rate of men in September, just as schools came back in session.

Selfless Love Battles Mental Health And Professional Loss

The mental health toll is visceral and immediate. But the pandemic could also have serious, long-term costs to the financial health of American women. Each day out of a job is a day not spent working toward financial independence or saving for the future. Women without jobs can’t earn raises. They can’t move into leadership roles or advocate for one another. The longer they spend out of the workforce, the harder it will be to get back in.

“The big ticket to inequality in the home is that the men can usually assume that because the mom loves the kids, she will not let the ball drop.”

Julie A. Nelson

However, despite all the battles that working moms face daily, none has been able to overcome their selfless love. That is a woman’s innate arsenal and strength, and she is always willing and able to deploy it effectively.

Sadly, a working woman who takes pride in her professional life, can work so “super hard” to get her dream job. But when life happens, like when pandemic struck, both the math and society’s expectations always gets stacked against her.

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