Monthly Archives: October 2020

Kid Consolation When Parents Lose Their Jobs

Work-Life Daily_ Kids Consolation When Parents Lose Their Jobs

Click to read: Kid Consolation When Parents Lose Their Jobs – When Parents Lose Their Jobs, Their Children Also Suffer. But Sometimes There’s A Consolation

Source: New York Times

Snippet: In six months without steady work, Gregory Pike, a single father in Las Vegas, has fallen behind on his rent and utilities. He borrowed money he cannot repay. Turned to food stamps and charity, and fretted that his setbacks may cloud his daughter’s future.

“We have benefited having more time together but not having money is not good. I’m being evicted.”

Michigan single mother

But despite the problems he has experienced since March, when the coronavirus eliminated his job, Mr. Pike has found an unexpected source of comfort, his kid consolation. That is time with his 6-year-old daughter, Makayla, whom he has raised alone for three years.

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Is There Any Consolation In Being Temporarily Unemployed?

“You know, I’ve gotten to know my kids a lot more,” said Aileen Kelly, a single mother of five who lost her job as a casino housekeeper at the pandemic’s start. “When you’re working, you don’t get the real feeling of raising your kids. You’re providing for them but you’re not teaching them.” But such rewards do not reduce the risks that unemployment brings.

“No one’s saying that families would choose to be unemployed. But I think we forget how short of time, low-income families have. They are short of time, short of money and often short of sleep,” said Jane Waldfogel, a professor at the Columbia School of Social Work. “If people are telling us they don’t have enough time with their children, that’s worth listening to. It’s an odd silver lining, but it’s there.”

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Working Moms And Dads Pick Your Slack

Work-Life Daily_ Working Moms And Dads Pick Up Your Slack

Click to read: Working Moms And Dads Pick Up Your Slack: Worker Resents Having To Pick Up Slack For Working Moms And Dads

Source: Washington Post

Snippet: Our federal workplace, under the Cares Act, permits parents to work 75 percent of their hours (30 hours/week, any days or times) for the same pay. I’m glad not to lose my teammates and work friends. And glad they can better balance their personal lives and work.

“Parents let’s be frank, moms are, like you. They are buried in additional unpaid work they can’t turn down.”

But this has translated to a heavy burden on those of us who are child-free. I’m overloaded, and the assignments just keep coming, with no legitimate-enough excuse to make my “no, thank you” stick. The constant narrative from leadership is what heroes parents are — and they are. But those of us without kids are doing so much heavy lifting, and we have families, too.

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Besides, I know that even though parenthood is a choice, having kids at home during a pandemic wasn’t. As an employed, teleworking, snugly housed and safe person, I know I’m privileged. That said, my workplace feels very unequal right now. Surely, it sounds ugly out loud. As a married woman without children, I’m losing my empathy and patience after months of being treated as though my time is therefore infinite. Therefore, working Moms and Dads need to pick up their slack!

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Marseille Named As Best French City For Work-Life Balance

Marseille Named As Best French City For Work-Life Balance

Images: sam71400/Getty/The city has a lot to offer, Marseille Named As Best French City For Work-Life Balance

France’s second largest city is one of the best places in the world for work-life balance according to a new study.

Marseille has been ranked second in the world for the work-life balance it offers. The results of a study by Holland and Barrett showed the Provençal city and capital of the Bouches-du-Rhône department has an average of 31.48 working hours per week. This is just one hour more than first-placed Amsterdam.

Meanwhile London came sixth with a weekly average of 33.48 working hours.

You may also like; Elusive Work-Life Balance in Bangkok; Ranked 43rd Out of 50

According to the study, Marseille also basks in 2,836 hours of sunshine each year. This is more than the Spanish city of Madrid which failed to make it into the top 10 for work-life balance. While Londoners can expect just 1,633 hours, making it the worst place in the top 10 to get your daily dose of vitamin D.

The Sunlight Cities Index

The Holland and Barrett study collected data for 210 cities around the world to produce The Sunlight Cities Index. This shows the best cities where inhabitants can spend the most amount of time in the sunshine to ensure they get the right amount of vitamin D.

Each city was given a score out of 100 after its assessment in four key areas. The first is for the average number of sunlight hours it gets each year. The second is for the average number of hours people spent working. This is to determine how much leisure time people have. The third is the number of free outdoor attractions that people have. This is to used to determine how easily people can get outdoors regardless of whether or not they have a garden. And the fourth is the average number of sleep hours people get.

Exploring Marseille Work-Life Balance Attraction

As France’s second largest city and with 57km of coastline there’s certainly plenty to see and do in Marseille according to complete France.

Now that Marseille is named as the best French city for Work-Life balance, those who have not explored the city with that eye should have another look.

For a starter, where should you go when you’ve logged off from work to make the most of your free time in the city’s plentiful sunshine? Give this a try, take a stroll around the colourful Vieux Port where sailing boats and super yachts line the harbour.

Explore Le Panier neighbourhood, the city’s oldest district, for old fashion views. There you’ll find sun-dappled squares to sit and enjoy an apéro while you soak up le soleil.

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Why A Work-Life Balance Scoreboard?

According to a Harvard Business School survey, 94% of working professionals reported working more than 50 hours per week. And nearly half said they worked more than 65 hours per week.

“… when the assumption that everyone needs to be always available was collectively challenged. Not only could individuals take time off, but their work actually benefited.”

The EU Gender Equality Index 2019 focuses on Work-Life Balance (WLB). The EU WLB scoreboard cuts across three broad areas {paid work, unpaid work (care) and education and training}. These is presented with 15 indicators in six specific areas of concern.

20 Highest Rated Companies For Work-Life Balance During COVID-19

Burning out? Check Out 20 Highest Rated Companies For Work-Life Balance During COVID-19

Due to COVID-19, the concept of having a work-life balance has increasingly become more difficult to achieve. Many employees have been experiencing long hours of work to meet deadlines and keep businesses afloat. This alters employee morale, wellness, and motivation, which unfortunately leads to burnout. Now, you can have a pick from the 20 highest rated companies for work-life balance during COVID-19.

Although the concept of work-life balance varies across companies, Glassdoor Sr. Economic Research Analyst Amanda Stansell was able to look at Glassdoor reviews from the past six months. This was used to reveal which employers prioritize their employees’ well-being during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The research found the monthly percentage of employee reviews in July 2020 on Glassdoor discussing mental health and similar topics rose 42 percent compared to six months earlier.

Prioritizing mental health and wellness within the workplace is now more important than ever. Not only to employers, but also for employees suffering from chronic workplace stress.

Additionally, Stansell and the team analyzed millions of employee reviews on Glassdoor to identify the top 20 companies for work-life balance in the U.S. This is as COVID-19 heightened the stress and turmoil people across the world face in and out of work.

Are you looking for an employer that cares for your mental health and prioritizes wellness? Check out the 20 Highest Rated Companies for Work-life Balance During COVID-19!

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Why A Work-Life Balance Scoreboard?

According to a Harvard Business School survey, 94% of working professionals reported working more than 50 hours per week and nearly half said they worked more than 65 hours per week.

“… when the assumption that everyone needs to be always available was collectively challenged, not only could individuals take time off, but their work actually benefited.”

The EU Gender Equality Index 2019 focuses on Work-Life Balance (WLB). The EU WLB scoreboard cuts across three broad areas {paid work, unpaid work (care) and education and training}. These is presented with 15 indicators in six specific areas of concern.

Build A Mentoring Relationship With A Leader You Admire

BUILD A MENTORING RELATIONSHIP WITH A LEADER YOU ADMIRE

image: trumzz/Getty Images/Build A Mentoring Relationship With A Leader You Admire

Years ago when I taught a graduate leadership course in Seattle, one of my students asked me to be his mentor. This was about a week after the class had ended. It was clear that the question was difficult for him. Throughout the course, he appeared disinterested in my teaching, aloof, and often scoffed at the materials I presented. I’d assumed that he didn’t like the course or me.

But what caught me off guard that day was his sincerity. He explained that he’d had some bad experiences with mentors in the past. He came to realize that the people he had reached out to and admired weren’t genuinely interested in helping him grow. And they usually wanted something in return: free labor, an ego boost, the chance to feel important.

Trusting someone he wanted to learn from was still difficult. But he’d found the courage to ask me anyway. His vulnerability was disarming. I’d never been formally asked to “mentor” anyone and I felt like a fraud. I feared that if he knew my many flaws and insecurities, I’d end up being yet another disappointment.

Reluctantly, I agreed and decided I could simply hide those parts of myself.

Trust, Vulnerability And Growth In Mentoring Relationships

It wasn’t until months later, when we had built a foundation of trust, that I felt comfortable enough to follow his example. Sick of carrying around my angst, I confessed my fears about being the “perfect” mentor. As it turned out, the last thing he wanted was my perfection. He wanted me to be human, to see how I dealt with my shortfalls, and grew to trust me more because I acknowledged them.

I tell this story because I understand how complicated relationships between different generations can be in academic and professional settings. We spend a great deal of time comparing what we each have to offer to one another, and to the world.

In academia, young students want professors to help them make sense of the world. While their professors are worried about keeping up with their publishing demands.

At work, many emerging leaders feel those senior to them stand in their way. While those in senior roles privately question their relevance in the face of younger, tech-savvy newcomers. Such is the dilemma that both sides faces in an effort to build a mentoring relationship.

It Is Beyond The Legacy Or Wisdom Of Older Leaders, We Need Each Other

The irony is that the legacy of older leaders is only secured through helping the young ones reach their potential. And the opportunity to fulfill your potential as a young leader can be realized much more fully if you make an effort to inherit the wisdom of your predecessors. We need each other to feel like we both matter.

If a senior leader you want to connect with hasn’t figured that out yet, there are ways to help them, as my mentee helped me. Of course, all generations have more work to do in this area. These connections can only be made if both sides build bridges and make an effort to understand our mutual wants and differences.

But right now, I want to empower you, the young leader, with a few tools that I’ve seen help lay the foundation.

Test Your Assumptions And Labels. 

Chances are, if you’ve struggled to connect with a particular older leader, you’ve formed biases about them. You may have interpreted some of their behavior as off-putting, unapproachable, or disinterested in you. While your concerns may very well be valid, it’s also important to check yourself before completely writing them off.

I initially interpreted my student’s aloofness as disinterest. When in fact, it was the opposite. You may be surprised by what you find when you dig a little deeper.

Before shutting the door on a relationship with an older employee, put yourself in their shoes. Could you be misinterpreting where they are coming from? Are you projecting some of your own anxiety or misgivings onto them?

If you have any connection with someone who knows them better, check in with them to find out more to test your beliefs. Make sure that your criteria for judging their behavior isn’t based on how similar or different they are from you. The things that are different about them, may end up being the most valuable.

Use Vulnerability, Not Just Confidence, To Build Credibility

Many emerging leaders feel the best way to win the approval of older leaders is to appear confident, smart, and assertive. But that can backfire. It can come across as entitled or overly self-assured.

After asking me to be his mentor, my graduate student went on to confess that his behavior during our class was his way of trying to prove that he didn’t need help. He told me, “It’s funny, I was looking to be developed and led by trying to convince both of us that I needed neither.” His humility deeply impressed me.

What will show more seasoned leaders your maturity and credibility is being vulnerable. Being able to openly talk about what you don’t know. Asking for help in places you feel unsure, and acknowledging areas you need to improve. While that may feel risky, older leaders know that there’s only so much legitimately earned confidence, someone who is early in their career will have. Faking more than you have will only make others less likely to trust you.

Demonstrating that you know your limitations by being confident enough to ask for help indicates you are trustworthy and open to learning. If you are struggling with a project, for instance, you might say, “I’d love to get your input on this. I’m feeling really good about these parts, but I haven’t had enough experience in this area and I know that it’s your expertise.”

Avoid Complete Deference

On the other hand, extreme deference can create distance. In some cases, it can make you come across as a suck up. In others, it establishes a formality that makes senior leaders feel as though they always have to “be on” when they are around you.

Believe it or not, deference triggers a sense of imposter syndrome, a fear many older leaders have (that they aren’t worthy of the role they are in). This was my struggle in my relationship with my graduate student.

Recommended: Mentoring During A Crisis – Place Of Self And Mentee

You want to be someone that older leaders can feel safe with. Someone who they can be themselves around. When leaders across generations can learn to be vulnerable with one another, it can be transformational.

Find Common Ground

What many emerging leaders long for is to feel respected by older leaders.

Creating “peership” with older leaders — approaching them as equals without being cocky and showing respect for their seniority without being overly deferent — is one of the hardest parts of these relationships.

To establish mutuality, learn about their lives outside of work. If they have pictures of their family in their office, ask about them. Or, if you’re on a video call and one of their kids walks in the room, use that chance to learn more about their life. To build a mentoring relationship that will last long, also find out what interests they have outside of work.

When my student and I were first getting to know each other, I was still a newcomer to Seattle. My family and I were steeped in boxes from our move to the new city and he offered to help. As we unpacked boxes of books in my office, he asked about my clients and the work I did. It became a ritual for us to sit on the floor in front of the bookcase and tell stories of leaders facing real-life challenges.

Shared humanity is a great way to establish common ground, setting the foundation for a strong relationship. It also helps neutralize any hierarchical differences without ignoring them. You can show respect for your differences in experience by asking about their career choices and how they’ve approached their development.

Ask For What You Need

As simple as it sounds, seasoned leaders love when younger leaders cut to the chase and ask for what they want. If you want more time with someone, ask for it within reason. You probably can’t get an hour a week, but you might get an hour a month. With such baby steps, you will build a mentoring relationship that is fulfilling.

If you want more opportunities to have your ideas heard, ask for it. You can say, “I know our meetings are very full, but sharing my ideas is an area I need to grow in. Sometimes we move so fast that I don’t feel comfortable jumping into the fray. I wonder if we could set aside 15 minutes in an upcoming meeting for me to share an idea and engage the team?”

What Rejection Actually Mean

If you fear your request will be denied, you’re not alone. Many emerging leaders are afraid of the feeling of rejection that comes with that denial. Instead of personalizing silence, or a “no” answer, ask the other person to help you understand.

Whatever their response, they likely have your best interest in mind. You may have to ask several times to make something happen. This is why you should always ask with a level of respect, and explain why your request makes sense. Any hint of insistence, entitlement, or sulking if your request isn’t granted, is more likely to be met with resistance.

Remember that your desire to connect with more experienced colleagues is worthy and admirable. You are beginning to walk your way to build a mentoring relationship that is mutually beneficial. You are striving to learn from them, to offer something in return, and to broaden your network beyond your peers. Learning how to make those desires known to senior leaders takes practice, but it’s a skill you will use all your life.

It may feel risky, and at times, it will feel uncomfortable. But that discomfort is the same thing that will make your relationship go from enjoyable to transformational.

Start Now, Start Small. Keep It Friendly, Informal And Enjoyable

It takes some work to build a mentoring relationship. But you can start small. Who is a more experienced professional or leader that you admire? Someone you’d want to emulate? Whose career has made you think differently about your own?

Reach out to them. Let them know how they, and their work have influenced you. And then, ask for a 20-minute virtual coffee. Prepare one or two questions to ask them. Keep it friendly and informal. Let them feel enjoyed, and help them to enjoy you. Some of the greatest relationships of our lives start with a simple question over a cup of coffee.

Click to read the original script @ Harvard Business Review – Build a Relationship With a Senior Leader You Admire by Ron Carucci


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Mentoring During A Crisis – Place Of Self And Mentee

Mentoring During A Crisis - Place Of Self And Mentee

image: Westend61/Getty Images/Mentoring During A Crisis-Place Of Self And Mentee

Shortly after September 11, 2001, I (David) stood in the cafeteria line at work, anxieties still swirling in my mind. I happened to see one of my mentors, a senior member of our department. After we exchanged hellos, our conversation quickly turned to current events.

I remember he said two simple – yet powerful – words: “It’s scary.”

Almost instantly, my fears began to settle, replaced by a sense of connection. Knowing I wasn’t alone made a difference.

Even The Strong Need A Strong Hand Of Support

We have combined ~50 years of experience mentoring healthcare professionals before the Covid crisis. And now during it, we’ve learned just how important mentors can be—especially for those on the front lines.

For months, doctors, nurses, grocery store workers, postal carriers, and many others have been navigating physical danger, complexity, and uncertainty, with no end in sight. Now more than ever, they need emotional support.

But they can’t always turn to their managers. They also may be consumed with solving problems and likely overwhelmed with keeping their organizations running.

Workers may also fear their managers. They are the ones who hold the key to their future advancement. There is always the concern that managers may view  a request for help as a weakness. That is where you as a mentor can play a critical role. You can provide them with a stabilizing force. This is the time to be that someone who can help talk them down when they’re triggered, scared, burned out, or confused—all off the record.

Fortify Yourself First

However, if you consider yourself a mentor to someone on the front lines, the first step is to take care of yourself. You can’t offer emotional support if you don’t have your own emotional fortifications in place. Then you can turn to helping your mentee’s by offering them emotional support and concrete tactics.

First, you need to take stock of your capacity. Do you have the necessary time, focus, and energy for your mentee? If you don’t have time but still want to help, one solution is to help your mentee’s develop a  “team of mentors.”

If you do determine that you have the bandwidth to play a mentorship role, ask yourself: what can I do to fortify myself? Ultimately, you cannot provide care to others with an empty tank.

The Basics Are Not Luxuries But Essentials

Adequate sleep, nutrition, exercise, and activities that provide rejuvenation and meaning—such as meditation, prayer, nature walks, listening or playing music—are not luxuries; they are essential.  

Micro-practices such as keeping a gratitude journal, deep breathing, and moments of mindfulness such as when using hand sanitizer can build moments of wellness into your day. And they take only seconds to minutes to implement.

And just as your mentee benefits from having you and other mentors to support them, you need your own support network as well. Highly effective leaders lean on support teams of colleagues near or far, and good mentors do the same. Do this by scheduling regular check-in calls with friends, family, mentors, coaches, spiritual advisors, or mental health professionals.

Encourage Reverse Mentoring

In the same vein, keep in mind that your relationship with your mentee isn’t one-way. Being open to learning from your mentees can be a source of positive energy for both of you. Reverse mentoring can pay big dividends, both emotionally and practically.

Voicing your appreciation for these moments of exchange can also build your relationship and provide its own form of emotional support to your mentee.

Attend To Your Mentee’s Emotional Well-Being

In your work with your mentees, it may be tempting to focus on teaching them new skills. You may also feel the need to give them advice about how to solve specific technical problems. But during a crisis and for front-line workers, you’re one of the few places and persons they can turn to for emotional support. So it’s critical that you make their well-being a focus for any mentoring discussion.

Encourage your mentees to share what they’re feeling. Reassure them, offer wellness strategies, and affirm their strengths.

How Are You Really Doing?

Begin with listening. Ask your mentees, “How are you really doing?”—more than once. Expect to hear about grief, anxiety, and fear. Encourage them to talk about these feelings.

Naming emotions helps us feel them, and allows them to flow through us, bringing a helpful shift in brain activity and perspective. Expect too that your mentoring meetings may involve more emotion than usual, including tears.

Practise Highly Supportive Reflective Listening

If you’re worried about what exact words to use with your mentees, know that reflective listening is in itself highly supportive. This just involves taking the essence of what the mentee said and offering it back as a connecting confirmation that they have been heard and understood.

For example, if your mentee is describing how stressful work is, you could say, “I hear it’s really stressful—and it’s hard to know what to do with the unexpected.”  

If you want to dig deeper, you can ask, “What is your biggest challenge right now?  What is helping? What’s going well—or still OK—in your world?”

In times of stress, clarifying what is most important to your mentees can be the biggest gift of all. In so doing you help them appreciate and focus on the things that bring meaning and purpose to their life.

Lower Expectations, Appreciate Strength

Offer reassurance and opportunities for connection. Discuss lowering expectations in these uncertain times. Explain that they shouldn’t feel they have to push themselves beyond their limits.

At the same time, express your appreciation for their strengths.

Simply naming them can be surprisingly helpful: “One of the things I most appreciate is your curiosity and drive for learning.” Or: “Coronavirus is one for the history books. You’re helping to pull us through. Thank you.”

Encourage Increase In Number And Spread of Mentee’s Support Team

Finally, share tactics for supporting their emotional well-being. Encourage your mentees to have their own support team and to limit their media exposure.

Offer a detail or two about your support team, and how you use it; ask about their own loved ones. Even just talking about mental health resources helps to normalize them. Each of us has used a coach, psychologist, therapist, or spiritual counselor. And at various times, has shared this fact with our mentees, as appropriate.

For both mentors and mentees, this may also be an especially meaningful time to renew dormant connections. Even if it’s been years since you’ve been in touch. A “check-in” call or e-mail can help.

And while virtual mentoring may not be as satisfying as the in-person kind, there is evidence supporting its efficacy.  In ways large and small, one person can make a lasting difference.

Even a few words, mentioned in passing, can last a lifetime.

Click to read the original script @ Harvard Business Review – Mentoring During A Crisis by David P. Fessell, Vineet Chopra and Sanjay Saint


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YALE YOUNG GLOBAL SCHOLARS (YYGS) 2021 PROGRAM

YALE YOUNG GLOBAL SCHOLARS (YYGS)

Yale Young Global Scholars (YYGS) has announced its decision to host all 2021 sessions virtually. Running the program virtually, started with the 2020 edition. It was a natural action for the program as organisations across the world went virtual because of the effect of COVID-19 pandemic. At YYGS, the top priority is protecting the health and safety of students, instructors, and staff in the program’s community.

The 2021 Yale Young African Scholars (YYAS) program will also be online. YYAS was modeled off its sister program, Yale Young Global Scholars, and continues to operate under its umbrella.

Yale Young Global Scholars (YYGS) is an unparalleled academic and leadership program at Yale University. It is an academic enrichment program for outstanding high school students from around the world. Each summer, students from over 130 countries (including all 50 U.S. states) participate in one interdisciplinary, two-week session.

Check Your Eligibility And Then Apply Now

Eligible Countries: YYGS accepts applications from ALL countries, and offers the opportunity for students to apply for need-based financial aid to students from ALL countries.

Eligibility: In order to apply to YYGS, applicants MUST fulfill all of the following requirements:

  • Age: Be at least 16 years old by July 19, 2021 (first day of Session III). This rule is so that YYGS is in compliance with legal restrictions for running a summer program for minors, and no exceptions can be made.
  • English Fluency: Be able to participate in a rigorous academic curriculum conducted in English.
  • Grade Level: Be a current high school sophomore or junior (or international equivalent).
  • Graduation Date: Be graduating in May/June 2022 or 2023 from the Northern Hemisphere, or in Nov./Dec. 2021 or 2022 from the Southern Hemisphere.
  • YYGS Participation: Be a first-time participant in YYGS. If you have participated in any YYGS session during a previous summer (e.g., 2020, 2019), then you are not eligible to participate during YYGS 2021. Please note: If you previously applied to YYGS but were not offered admission or were unable to attend AND you meet the eligibility criteria noted above, then you are encouraged to re-apply for YYGS 2021.

APPLY NOW for the 2021 Yale Young Global Scholars (YYGS) program!

Application Deadline: November 10, 2020 (Early Action) and January 12, 2021 (Regular Decision).

Fees: Program tuition is significantly adjusted to account for the virtual offering. The total cost for a two-week session of YYGS Connect 2021 is $3,500 USD. YYGS still plans to award financial aid (in partial or full tuition discounts) to students with demonstrated need. To be considered for financial aid, students must complete the financial aid section of the YYGS admissions application.

About Yale Young Global Scholars (YYGS) Online Program

The online program, YYGS Connect, will closely mirror and build upon last year’s online model. Summer 2020 was incredibly diverse and included participants from over 130 countries and all 50 U.S. states.

Students were able to deeply engage with one another during live academic program components. This also continued within private official YYGS Facebook groups, and as members of the YYGS social media team. The program is dedicated to continuing to find creative ways to foster global connections in a virtual setting.

Participants will take part in a curriculum that is designed to be as rigorous and intellectually rewarding as the on-campus experience.

This programming includes access to Yale campus resources through Opportunities Across Yale (OAY) virtual events. OYA connect students to libraries, campus departments, faculty, and more.

During YYGS Connect, students will average 20 hours a week (with weekends off) and participate in live Yale faculty lectures, small-scale seminars, simulations and more. All students who successfully complete the program will receive an electronic completion certificate.

Testimonial About Yale Young Global Scholars (YYGS) Connect – Online Program

“Even though our daughter couldn’t have the in-person experience because of the pandemic, she left each online class feeling like she had been pushed to think critically and brainstorm ideas to solve many different global challenges. We got to learn something new every night at dinner as she enthusiastically brought up the discussions she had in class. Additionally, YYGS made sure that the transition to an online platform was as seamless as possible. The program managers were extremely organised and supportive throughout the session. YYGS was definitely the best and most enriching summer experience she’s ever had.” -Nelson S., YYGS Connect (2020), Parent

Similar to last year, students will participate in a morning or afternoon track that best suits their time zone. YYGS Connect has a strict attendance policy, and students must attend all program components to earn their completion certificate. Interested students can view tentative schedules on the YYGS Connect webpage.

“Despite [YYGS] going virtual due to the pandemic, I was able to meet a diverse group of people from all over the world, who had their own unique sets of beliefs. To this day, I am still talking to the people that I have met from the two week program, and I continue to meet more alums through the alumni network.” –Eric L., YYGS Connect (2020), Student

Learn More – Sign Up For Webinar

YYGS staff will host a live webinar next week to discuss the virtual program in more detail. Guest speakers will include a YYGS lecturer, instructor, and alumnus who attended YYGS Connect last year. Sign-up for the webinar here.


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I am a CEO with stage 4 cancer. Let me tell you about life

I’m a CEO with stage 4 cancer. Here’s what I can tell you about life

image: Getty/CEO’s major lesson after cancer diagnosis/I Am A CEO With A Stage 4 Cancer. Let Me Tell You About Life.

As the CEO of US real estate company, Keyrenter Franchise, Aaron Marshall spent around 60 to 90 hours per week at work. That all changed when he was diagnosed with stage two and stage four cancer in his appendix, colon and liver.

“After a diagnosis of cancer, it changes your entire thinking,” Marshall told Yahoo Finance. “It helps put things in perspective, and things that once were a priority were no longer so.”

I Am A CEO With Stage 4 Cancer

In the beginning, Marshall considered stepping down from his role as CEO, but his wife urged him to stay on.

“My wife gave me the advice I needed – she said, ‘you need something to get yourself out of bed in the morning’,” he said.

As a CEO, it can be hard to take your foot off the pedal and allow your staff to do the hard yards. But this is exactly what Marshall had to do if he was going to continue.

“I knew I needed to focus on healing my body, but I also needed something to get me out of bed. I re-prioritised my days and delegated many tasks to my capable team,” he said.

And this is one of those that always seems impossible. “I empowered them to succeed in their roles. And now, I meet with them one-on-one each week to ensure they are confident in what they are doing. The company has a vision and each team member is part of that.”

But while Marshall finally learned the importance of having a great work-life balance, he said his biggest lesson through it all was this: “Life is precious.”

“Even more so now, I encourage people to find their passion and follow it,” he said.

Live Like There’s No Expiration Date

Despite his cancer diagnosis, Marshall said he doesn’t believe in expiration dates. He believes everyone should live the same way, cancer or not.

“Growing up, my parents always said they would vacation and do more things once they retired and had more time,” Marshall said.

“Shortly after retirement, my mum was diagnosed with a disease that put her in a wheelchair. They have made travel work in their retirement, but it’s not the way they envisioned.”

So, Marshall made a decision early on not to wait.

“Life is about the journey, and we need to enjoy it. We need not wait until some future day that may never come,” he said. “Since my diagnosis, this drive has only increased. I want to make memories with my family, and spend time with them, enjoying life and guiding them as they become of age and make decisions on their own.”

His one piece of advice? “Enjoy life.”

I Am A CEO With Stage 4 Cancer – And I Know Being Positive Is A Choice

Marshall said he’s become something of a mentor to his peers and colleagues, and the one question they always ask him is, “how do you stay so positive?”

And the answer is simple: positivity is intentional.

“I have had many challenges throughout my life that shaped me to be the man I am today,” Marshall said.

“From birth, being born with a cleft palate, the surgeries, the speech delays. I had a drive to overcome these challenges. As I look back, I realise these were all lessons that are helping me today with my current cancer challenge.”

And while his cancer diagnosis might be out of his control, the key to staying positive is to focus on what you can control.

“I don’t just take what my doctor tells me. If I did, it would be hard to stay positive,” he said. “Instead, I focus on what I can control – my diet, my attitude, exercise, life balance, and I am not afraid to change directions if needed.”

“I still have bad days, and sometimes we need to feel those feelings, but I don’t dwell on them. I let them come and then I get up and get moving.”

Click to read: I’m a CEO with stage 4 cancer. Here’s what I can tell you about life

Source: Yahoo

Welcome to Worklife Feed articles and site-files indexing and adaptation series.

How Does My Work Life And Faith In Jesus Connects?

God At Work_HOW DOES MY WORK LIFE AND FAITH IN JESUS CONNECTS

Work can be a daily grind; a hard, monotonous set of thankless tasks. In the midst of the toil, many are plagued by a lack of purpose, confused as to what to do and who to become. And while some of our vocations may seem more overtly meaningful than others’, the truth is that most of us work because we have to. It is a means to an end―survival. So a person of faith can rightly ask the question, how does my work life and faith in Jesus connect?

Every kind of work is a sacred calling. However, again, how does my work life and faith in Jesus connect? How does Sunday relate to Monday? What difference does the gospel make when I am stocking shelves, turning wrenches, or answering phones?

“The priesthood of all believers did not turn all Christians into pastors. But it did turn every kind of work into sacred calling.”

These are the types of questions that commonly haunt the everyday, ordinary Christian. For those who are serious and sincere in their faith, but who are not part of a pastoral staff or religious nonprofit, what role do they play in God’s kingdom on a day-to-day basis?

Connecting the dots between the Christian faith and missionary work is easy. Connecting the dots for truck drivers, politicians, union leaders, the police and dental assistants is hard. They are therefore entitled to ask, over and over again, how does my work life and faith connects?

How Does My Work Life And Faith Fits Every Kind Of ‘Sacred’ Work?

How does my faith in Jesus connect with my work life?

Gene E. Veith’s book God at Work has quickly become a classic in the Faith and Work titles. Written in 2002, Veith approaches the conversation, employing the Lutheran framework for vocation that emerged amidst the Protestant Reformation of the 16th century.

The Reformers, especially Luther, sought to reclaim the notion of calling (vocatio in Latin) for the Christian laity.

Recommended: Falwell Marketplace Faith And Evangelicals Theology or Worklife Frustration, Desperation, And Wrong Steps

Veith writes, “In scrutinizing the existing ecclesiastical system in light of the Gospel and the Scriptures. The Reformers insisted that priests and nuns and monastics did not have a special claim to God’s favor. But that laypeople, too could live the Christian life to its fullest.”

Work (Vocation), Life (Family, Citizenship, Church), And The Priesthood

This dovetailed nicely with the well-known reformational emphasis on the priesthood of all believers. The doctrine that “all Christians enjoy the same access to Christ and are spiritually equal before Him.”

“The doctrine of vocation, though it has to do with human work, is essentially about God’s work. It is also about how God works in and through our lives.”

The “priesthood of all believers,” Veith clarifies, did not turn all Christians into pastors. But it did turn “every kind of work into sacred calling.”

Building upon this foundation, Luther and the Reformers recognized multiple callings for every Christian. This includes the calling to work, family, citizenship, and church.

Two-Kingdom’s Model: The Super-Efficiency Of One Compared To Another

Each of these vocational categories receive a chapter in Veith’s book. But, before diving into these, he considers “How God Works through Human Beings.” There, he employs the Lutheran Two-Kingdom’s model to explain how God works through means.

Following Luther, Veith puts forward distinct spiritual and earthly kingdoms. He explained that God uses the spiritual kingdom to restore sinners and to rule in their hearts, equipping them for everlasting life.

Just as God uses the means of the church to accomplish the purposes of his spiritual kingdom, he also works through means of the earthly kingdom, especially natural law, to accomplish his plans.

He as well works through the so-called “secular” vocations of people in the earthly kingdom. “That is, He institutes families, work, and organized societies, giving human beings particular parts to play in His vast design.”

How Does My Work Life And Faith Addresses The Purpose of Vocation?

Veith also addresses “The Purpose of Vocation,” “Finding Your Vocations,” and “Your Calling as a Worker.”

He writes that vocation is played out, not just in extraordinary acts, the great things we will do for the Lord. And not in the great success we envision in our careers someday. But in the realm of the ordinary.

He then encourages that we demonstrate our ‘vocation’ in whatever we face in the often humdrum present. Which can be while washing the dishes, buying groceries, going to work, driving the kids somewhere, or hanging out with friends. He believes this is the realm into which we have been called and in which our faith bears fruit in love.

Connecting Work-Life, Faith, Today’s Misery And Tomorrow’s Greatness?

This emphasis on the “ordinary” is right and beautiful and has gained greater traction in recent years. An arguable extension of the “faith and work” movement has been the revival of interest in everyday liturgies. This see all of life as sacred and holy, purposeful before God, despite how extraordinary it may or may not be.

Veith goes on to say, that “the doctrine of vocation, though it has to do with human work, is essentially about God’s work and how God works in and through our lives.” If there were a one-sentence summary to the book, this would be it.

He repeats this idea at the end of chapter five, reflecting on those who responded to the planes crashing into the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001. Those responders insisted their bravery was simply, “doing their jobs.”

Veith responded this way, “That is the doctrine of vocation. Ordinary men and women expressing their love and service to their neighbor, ‘just doing our jobs.’”

Veith’s God at Work made a deep impact upon its release in 2002 and continues to occupy an important place in the ongoing conversation on faith, work, and vocation.

May God at Work remain not only on the shelves of those teaching and preaching about Christian vocation. But may it find its way to the bedside table of all Christians, that each may become a mature and ministering worker of God.

Welcome to WorkLife Feed articles and site-files indexing and adaptation series.

ERLC Editor’s Note: The original article is part of ERLC’s primer series on Christians ethics. It is where a respected leader and thinker recommends and gives a summary overview of a book that helps orient readers to a certain aspect of ethics and philosophy. This series is designed to equip the local church to engage foundational texts of Christian ethics. Find the entire series here.

What To Do If Your Main Squeeze Puts Work Before Your Relationship

What To Do If Your Main Squeeze Puts Work Before Your Relationship

It is not about infidelity, but it is lonely when the one you love most puts work before your relationship. If you are considering what to do if your main squeeze is putting work before your relationship, take a deep breath. In this article, you will be presented with suggestive steps that you can take.

Your main squeeze could have failed to appear at family gatherings too many times because of work. At other times, she may have promised to spend more time with you and not delivered because work comes first.

But has he said, “I’ll quit tomorrow,” but tomorrow never comes? Or has she stood you up or kept you waiting because of work? If you answered yes to these questions, your partner may be suffering from work addiction.

What To Do If Your Main Squeeze Is Wedded To Work

Kate’s work obsession became like a weekend lover.

She lied to her family so she could rendezvous with work at the office: “I’d tell my family I was going shopping on a Saturday and I’d end up in my office working. Or I’d tell them I was going to my girlfriend’s house. After calling my girlfriend’s and not finding me, they’d call the office and say, ‘I thought you were going to Dottie’s.’ I felt like I’d been caught with my hand in the cookie jar.”

Recommended: Work Infidelity Sabotages Careers And Love Relationship

If you’re the mate of a workaholic, like Jena, you probably feel alone as a partner and parent, as if you’ve been left with the responsibility of holding the family together.

You feel unimportant and minimized, even innately defective, because you get so little attention from your partner. You might even harbor feelings of anger, resentment, sadness, and guilt.

Or you may live under a distinct set of unwritten and unspoken rules. Rules dictated by your mate’s work habits: Handle everything at home. Don’t expect anything from me, because I have enough on my plate at work. Put me at the center of your life and plan the household and family and social life around my work schedule. I’m depending on you to do your best, be perfect, and not let me down.

Click to read: What To Do If Your Main Squeeze Puts Work Before Your Relationship

Source: Forbes

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